Amari Bailey Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Amari Bailey is currently the fourth-ranked recruit in the 2022 high school class[1].

With Ziaire Williams and BJ Boston getting superstar priority and the nature of Sierra Canyon’s more individualistic approach on offense, the six-foot-four combo-guard had to act as more of an off-guard in his sophomore season.

But when he had the chance to create offense here and there, the 16-year-old[2] impressed with his combination of athletic ability and craft getting to the basket.

On the other end, his 185-pound frame in the context of his height and his age is promising. It suggests he could very well become strong enough to offer versatility matching up against bigger types, but Bailey is currently more underdeveloped in terms of technique and effectiveness.

He had to match up against opposing ball handlers regularly, in order to accommodate Williams and Boston regularly sharing the court with Terren Frank and either Yu Jiahao or Shy Odom at center, and struggled in every aspect of defense, except maybe transition defense.

FINISHING

  • Pretty resourceful off the bounce for someone his age, both in terms of quickness and skill, able to get to the basket in volume in isolation and turning the corner in pick-and-roll at the high school level
    • Has a quick first step, out of a standstill position and off a hesitation move, and can get by his man on straight-line speed
    • Has shown glimpses of being able to keep the ball in a string
    • Showed attention to detail looking to protect the ball in traffic
    • Can go to euro-steps, spin moves, stop-and-start suddenness and in-and-out dribbles to craftly manipulate his way through traffic
  • Flashed some explosive leaping ability off one foot in transition, with a head of steam, but doesn’t often get as much lift in the half-court, most often looking to gallop into two-foot leaps in traffic
    • Has shown good touch around the basket
    • Flexible and strong enough to hang and adjust his body in the air
    • Capable of finishing through contact – powered through Chet Holmgren at one point in the game against Minnehaha Academy in a way that stood out
    • Not as adept at finishing with his right hand as he is with his dominant left hand
    • Really impressed with his dexterity using his off arm to shield his finish from a rim protector coming to meet him at the summit
    • Has developed a nice head fake off a hard jump-stop to bait the defender into leaving his feet and draw a foul
    • Flashed a wrong foot, wrong hand layup in transition
  • Takes floaters off a jump-stops and runners off pass-fakes to finish over length from the in-between area but hasn’t yet developed particularly impressive touch on those
  • Can play above the rim as a target for lobs sneaking behind the defense on backdoor cuts

PULL-UP SHOOTING

  • Capable shooter off the bounce
    • Can stop on a dime
    • Elevates off good rhythm on stop-and-pop pull-ups
    • Can get to his spots around the elbow off hesitation moves

PASSING

  • Had some noteworthy moments passing on the move but given the nature of Sierra Canyon’s offense, Bailey acted more as a caretaker off-guard who got to create his own offense on occasion but was not relied on to create for others in volume
  • Proved he can see the whole floor pretty well against a static defense and toss up well timed lobs out of a standstill position to backdoor cutters
  • Pretty adept at keeping his dribble alive on deep penetration to launch a hammer pass to the weakside corner

SPOT-UP FINISHING

  • Left-handed shooter who does not set his body with both his feet pointed towards the rim
  • Elevates off 1-2 footwork stepping into his shot on spot-ups
  • Gets little elevation off the ground
  • Goes through compact mechanics with a low release out in front and a quick-ish trigger
  • Guide hand discipline on follow through could use some work
  • Capable open-shot shooter at this point of his development who was not given a chance to show if he has any sort of versatility to his release

OTHER AREAS OF OFFENSE

  • Acts as a threat to get the occasional putback dunk
  • Took a smaller/weaker matchup to the post a couple of times
    • Looked to spin baseline both times, at one point to launch a hammer pass to the weakside corner and another to finish on short toss in

DEFENSE

  • Stood out with his energy executing full-court presses
  • Hustles back in transition defense
    • Quick leaper off two feet to block a shot running back
  • Often approached opposing ball handlers in a soft stance in the half-court
  • Moves his feet to slide laterally a couple of times in one direction but doesn’t play with enough physicality on defense to chest up and contain dribble penetration through contact, despite his 185-pound frame, while also getting beat out an island eventually
  • Underdeveloped at negotiating screens
    • Went under picks at the point of attack quite a bit – hustled to try beating the ball handler to the spot on the other side but rarely managed to contest pull-ups effectively
    • More of a mixed bag when he went over – could not get around the ball screen cleanly but hustled in pursuit to bother from behind
    • Defended chasing around pindown screens a little bit – lacks the standing reach to contest catch-and-shoots effectively when he’s not within the shooter’s personal space
  • Did not stand out as much of a contributor off the ball
    • Prone to get caught ball watching and give up a backdoor cut
  • Flies by on closeouts and gets blown by

[1] According to ESPN

[2] DOB: Feb/17/2004

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Brandon Boston, Jr. Scouting Report

CONTEXT

BJ Boston was the seventh-ranked recruit in the 2020 high school class[1].

After spending his first three years of high school at Norcross High School in Georgia, the six-foot-six wing transferred to Sierra Canyon in California for his senior season.

He joined a star-studded squad that featured Ziaire Williams, Terren Frank, Amari Bailey and the sons of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, and went on to play a demanding schedule with an absurd number of miles traveled for teenagers, featuring more appearances on ESPN’s platforms than the Knicks.

Boston didn’t look his best earlier in the season, to the point I actually viewed Frank as the most interesting player on the team when I wrote about him in early January, which was prior to Williams getting fully integrated after only becoming eligible in late December. But as the year went along, Boston eventually established himself as the second-best player on the team on offense.

Sierra Canyon played a my turn, your turn (Williams), my turn, your turn, his turn (Bailey, sometimes Frank) approach in the half-court, mostly relying on the brilliance of its wings in isolation, and occasionally in pick-and-roll.

The 18-year-old[2] fit that offense very well, putting together some of the sickest highlight clips you are ever going to find, nailing some awesome pull-up three-pointers with a hand in his face after shaking his man with nifty dribble moves.

He will enter college a little more unproven in terms of handling in pick-and-roll, though. Unfortunately for him, his next team (Kentucky) doesn’t have a great track record of putting its wings in position to showcase their development in that area, so he’ll probably enter the NBA with about the same questions.

On other end, Boston is a man without a country right now, lacking the strength to check power wings any time soon and the quickness to crossmatch onto smaller types on a regular basis.

ESPN ranked him eighth in its way-too-early 2021 mock draft.

ISOLATION OFFENSE

  • Lives to take side-step and step-back three-pointers, able to create separation on pound dribbles and nasty crossovers going between the legs or behind the back with flashes of a tight handle keeping the ball in a string
    • Hard to say without data how great a shot maker he is for sure, but the ball does go in quite a bit
  • Has side-to-side shake and some straight-line speed with the ball, as well as proved capable of maintaining his balance and his momentum forward through contact in high school
    • Can pivot into well-coordinated spin moves and mix in some hesitation moves as well
  • So-so finisher overall but looked much improved towards the end of the season compared to the beginning, when he came off the bench for a while[3]
    • Explosive leaper off two feet uncontested and able to go up with power off one foot with a head of steam, usually in transition, but has shown to struggle with his lift without space to load up his leap briefly
    • Touch on finger-roll layups left something to be desired at times
    • Not very adept at finishing through contact at this point due to his very thin 175-pound frame in the context of his six-foot-six height
    • Flashed an impressive high glass finish off a spin move at one point
    • Hasn’t yet developed the flexibility to adjust his body in the air whenever needed
    • Prone to challenging rim protectors without much of a plan
  • Capable of making basic reads on the move but you don’t often see a lot of drop-offs and kickouts from him

PICK-AND-ROLL OFFENSE

  • More willing and focused of a shot creator for others in pick-and-roll
    • Can deliver over the top on jump-passes to the roll man on the side of the floor
    • Attempts some hooks passes to the weakside operating in middle high pick-and-roll but hasn’t yet developed a whole lot of timing in his delivers
    • Flashed some dexterity feeding stretch big men with the skip pass against the momentum of his body in pick-and-pop

FLOOR SPACING

  • Not shy of attempting some really long catch-and-shoot three-pointers and though they almost always look ill-advised because of the distance, Boston has proven himself capable of hitting some from such a deep range
  • Very capable open-shot shooter with a fluid catch-and-shoot stroke
    • Catches on the hop
    • Goes through compact mechanics with a low release out in front
    • Gets great elevation off the ground and can get his shot off comfortably over most closeouts
    • Tends to get a good arc in his shot
    • Looked like he needed an extra split second to load up his shot on occasion but for the most part showed decent speed in his release
  • Didn’t have a chance to show a whole lot of versatility to his release but took some three-pointers sprinting off pindown screens
    • Footwork setting his base on the move looks promising
  • Very smooth operator out of triple threat position, escaping into two-dribble pull-ups in phenomenal rhythm against hard closeouts

POST OFFENSE

  • Took smaller matchups to the post every once in a while but hasn’t yet developed all that many resources to operate out of that area effectively
    • Faced up at one point and set up a step-back pull-up off a jab-step
    • Attempted a turnaround fadeaway jumper at another point

OFFENSIVE REBOUNDING

  • Impressed with his knack for generating second chance opportunities in high school
  • Hunts for offensive rebounds and acts as a legit putback dunk threat
  • Also showed a quick second jump to fight for tip-ins and 50-50 balls

CUTTING

  • Powerful leaper off two feet with space to load up and showed to be an option to play above the rim as a target for lobs on backdoor cuts

INDIVIDUAL DEFENSE

  • Bends his knees to get down in a stance
  • Has a few lateral slides in him to stay in front of similar-sized players in isolation but lacks the strength, the physicality and the tenacity to contain dribble penetration through contact, thus not projecting as a good option to check the opponents’ most threatening wing at this point of his development
  • Switched/crossmatched onto smaller players from time-to-time and though there were flashes of intensity trying to heat up opposing ball handlers on full-court presses, Boston generally struggled against more capable types in the half-court
    • Doesn’t have enough slides to stay in front of guards out on an island
    • Got shook side-to-side and blown by
    • Struggles to go over picks cleanly at the point of attack
    • Can block a shot from the side in recovery if aided by a help defender stopping the ball

HELP DEFENSE

  • Showed decent activity off the ball
  • Puts his length to use in the passing lanes, gets deflections
  • Rotates in to pick up the roll man and off the weakside to help at the rim
    • Can block a shot on occasion
  • Will mix it up on scrums from time-to-time but is pretty soft with his boxouts and gets pushed out of the way by true big men
    • Quickness chasing the ball off the rim did not stand out
  • Sells out to closeout to the three-point line and gets blown by a troubling amount

[1] According to ESPN

[2] DOB: Nov/28/2001

[3] If you follow me on twitter for a while, odds are you know that I’m not really big on the idea of starting as a matter of status, which is really prevalent in the US, but it’s because people care so much about it there that it’s noteworthy when a highly touted player does come off the bench

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Ziaire Williams Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Ziaire Williams was the eighth-ranked recruit in the 2020 high school class[1].

After spending his first three years of high school at Notre Dame High School, the six-foot-eight wing transferred to Sierra Canyon for his senior season.

He joined a star-studded squad that featured BJ Boston, Terren Frank, Amari Bailey and the sons of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, and went on to play a demanding schedule with an absurd number of miles traveled for teenagers, featuring more appearances on ESPN’s platforms than the Knicks.

Williams ended the season as the best player on the team on offense. Sierra Canyon played a my turn, your turn (Boston), my turn, your turn, his turn (Bailey, sometimes Frank) approach in the half-court, mostly relying on the brilliance of its wings in isolation, and occasionally in pick-and-roll.

The 18-year-old[2] exceled at creating his offense one-on-one and the sheer volume of talent at Sierra Canyon’s disposal consistently overwhelmed most of the competition it faced in California.

On the other end, he held his own when challenged one-on-one and showed glimpses of being able to defend the point of attack effectively but needs to develop a lot physically to be considered an option to guard the power wings his height suggests he should match up with in the pros.

The Stanford-commit also did not prove to be much of an asset in help defense, which was sort of a disappointment considering his combination of physical profile and athletic ability.

ESPN ranked fifth in its way-too-early 2021 mock draft and Williams enters his freshman year college viewed as one of those prospects could end up the number one pick in the draft one year from now.

ISOLATION OFFENSE

  • Aggressive pull-up shooter
    • At times overaggressive – not shy of taking long-range pull-up bombs early in the shot clock on no-pass possessions
    • Plays with good rhythm stopping on a dime and rises with good balance off the bounce
    • Has shown a knack for getting to his spots around the elbow
    • Creates separation via crossovers, hesitation moves and going between the legs into a step-back – has a pretty good handle for someone his height
  • Has a quick first step, not just off the catch but out of a standstill position as well, and managed to get to the basket in a position of strength constantly in high school
    • Not very quick with the ball and struggles to play through contact but can pivot into a well-coordinated spin move to gain ground when he’s forced out of a straight-line drive
    • Prone to driving into crowds
    • Has shown some comfort going to his left hand around the basket
    • Prone to challenging rim protectors without a plan
    • Not strong enough to finish through contact regularly due to his thin 180-pound frame in the context of his six-foot-eight height
    • Explosive leaper off one foot with a head of steam behind him but tends to act more as a rim-level finisher in traffic
    • Can adjust his body in the air for double-clutch finishes and reverses around rim protectors
  • Has flashed a floater off a jump-stop to finish over length from the in-between area
  • Can make basic reads on kickouts off drawing two to the ball and drop-offs off engaging the last line of defense

PICK-AND-ROLL OFFENSE

  • Took some smooth two-dribble pull-ups in side pick-and-roll
  • Ran the occasional middle high pick-and-roll off a catch-and-hold
    • Can deliver basic jump-passes to the roll man over the top
    • Hasn’t shown anything particularly impressive in terms of creating for others on more advanced reads
    • Plays with some pace working to create separation for a one-dribble pull-up

TRANSITION OFFENSE

  • Passes ahead to speed up the pace of the game
  • Can grab-and-go off a defensive rebound and take it end-to-end
    • Explosive leaper off one foot with a head of steam behind him to go up with power for windmill dunks
  • Explosive leaper off two feet to play above the rim as a target for lobs filling the lanes

POST OFFENSE

  • Will take a smaller/weaker matchup to the post every once in a while
  • More often looks for basic turnaround fadeaway jumpers, at times off a hiked leg
  • Has shown glimpses of a face-up package, for now most commonly looking for a no-dribble jumper off a jab-step

FLOOR SPACING

  • Has a very fluid catch-and-shoot stroke
    • Catches on the hop
    • Needs a slight dip for rhythm but it’s not that pronounced
    • Fully extends himself for a high release
    • Has great guide-hand discipline on the follow through
    • Shows great weight transfer on spot-ups
  • More of an open-shot shooter at this point of his development, having not yet shown much versatility to his release
  • Has great rhythm and balance shot-faking into a one-dribble pull-up off an escape dribble against flyby closeouts

INDIVIDUAL DEFENSE

  • Approaches the opponent in more of a hunched down posture rather than bending his knees to get down in a proper stance
  • Has a few lateral slides in him in one direction to stay in front out in space but is unable to contain dribble penetration through contact at this point of development
    • Has shown glimpses of attempting to leverage his length into reaching around for steals or taps
  • Flashed some side-to-side quickness to stay attached to smaller players in isolation
  • Puts in the effort to contest pull-up jumpers and can get a block on occasion
  • Doesn’t do well sliding cleanly around screens but works to go over the pick at the point of attack as well as he can and hustles in pursuit to challenge shots effectively from behind

HELP DEFENSE

  • Hustles back in transition and can pick up the occasional chase-down block
  • Decent position defense clogging driving lanes, not so much to leverage his length into making plays from the side but stunting in an extra step to draw a charge
  • Can jump a passing lane but doesn’t really play with the sort of intensity needed to wreak havoc to create steals and deflections in volume
  • Doesn’t really mix it up on scrums under the rim
    • Not always all that inclined to boxout
    • Pretty soft with his boxouts whenever he does put a body on whoever is close by
  • Does contribute to the rebounding process by crashing the glass, impressing his explosiveness chasing the ball off the rim
  • Extremely uneven with his closeouts
    • At times, impresses with his urgency and his balance running the shooter off the line and subsequently sliding fluidly to defend off the bounce
    • At others, flies by and gets blown by

[1] According to ESPN

[2] DOB: Sep/12/2001

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Cade Cunningham Scouting Report

CONTEXT

If you are reading this blog, odds are you know plenty enough about Cade Cunningham by now, so you don’t really need a write-up on his background, and I’ll just update you with the latest developments;

  • Despite being the sort of prospect NBA teams plan to tank for years in advance, he ended up the second-ranked recruit in the 2020 high school class[1] because Jalen Green had a killer senior year at Prolific Prep
  • With Cunningham leading the way, Montverde Academy dominated high school basketball in Florida, to the point where it started to become widely speculated as perhaps the greatest high school team ever
  • In one of Montverde’s appearances on ESPN, a graphic showcasing Cunningham’s profile had the line “complete player” in the section under scouting report. I first snarked at the simplicity of the assessment but upon further thought, it is actually about right
  • The NCAA punished Oklahoma State with a postseason ban for this next season and there was trepidation at first that the six-foot-seven point-guard would then opt to leave school and sit out the year or join the G-League but he later announced he intended to fulfill his commitment
    • It is worth keeping in mind that part of why the 18-year-old[2] agreed to spend his pre-NBA year at Oklahoma State is the presence of his older brother in the coaching staff
  • ESPN ranked him first in its way-too-early 2021 mock draft

PASSING

  • Acted more as a primary scorer in the most prominent games this past season but it is worth establishing first that his court vision and the versatility of his passing remain the most appealing attributes of his skillset
  • Consistently impresses with the timing, touch, and accuracy of his deliveries in transition
    • Hook passes to the corner
    • Shovel passes to the wing
    • No-look passes with a numbers advantage
    • Lobs on the move with perfect timing
  • Has developed remarkable manipulation skills for someone his age against a set defense in the half-court
    • Passes over the top in side pick-and-roll
    • Crosscourt passes against the momentum of his body in middle pick-and-roll
    • Well-timed pocket passes
    • Lobs off putting the on-ball defender on his back and engaging the help defender to free up the roll man
    • Hammer passes to weakside shooters off deep dribble penetration
  • Showed in his time with the United States at the U19 World Cup a year ago that he doesn’t need to monopolize possession to the ball to impact ball movement, able to act as a connective tissue to create for others against a scrambling defense as well
    • Kickouts and drop-offs off engaging the last line of defense on straight-line drives
    • Extra passes around the horn to keep the offense humming
    • Touch passes off cuts

IN-BETWEEN SCORING

  • Has good feel for using or declining picks at the point of attack to create separation or get into the lane
  • Continued to show remarkable dexterity and impressive versatility to his finishing over length from the in-between area, able to launch floaters in a multitude of ways
    • Runners
    • Teardrops off euro-steps
    • Floaters off a jump-stop
    • Touch-shots off the catch on cuts
    • Push-shots off a shot-fake to get his defender to flyby
  • One-dribble pull-up jumper off the ball-screen has become very smooth
  • Seemed to want to showcase the development of his pull-up package in isolation a little more this past season
    • Impressed with his calmness not getting sped up late in the shot clock
    • Not very sudden or shifty to shake his man out of position all that often but manages to create separation via crafty ball-handling and footwork with in-and-out dribbles, crossovers and step-backs
    • Doesn’t have a high release on his pull-up jumper but gets good elevation and proved capable of getting his shot off over big men on switches

FINISHING

  • Was consistently able to play through contact in high school thanks to his strong 215-pound frame
  • Struggled as a finisher in a more demanding environment at the U19 World but those issues didn’t seem to carry to the high school season
  • Made strides in terms of protecting the ball in traffic some more
  • Mostly an up-and-down rim-level finisher but started to show some versatility to his finishing package dealing with a help-defender parked between him and the basket
    • Showed the flexibility needed to hang or adjust his body in the air for double clutch and finger-roll finishes
    • Seems more capable and more comfortable of going to his left hand
    • Flashed a very impressive wrong foot, wrong hand layup at one point
    • Can go up with power off one foot in space but hasn’t yet shown to be as explosive in traffic

SHOOTING

  • Release off the catch continues to look pretty fluid
    • Catches on the hop
    • Goes through compact mechanics with a low release out in front but manages to get good elevation to be able to shoot over closeouts comfortably more often than not
  • Hasn’t yet developed the trigger and the footwork to take shots on the move regularly but toyed with some quick bombs joining the offense late in transition
  • Hard to say for sure without data but the brutal struggles he dealt with shooting at the U19 World Cup (when he missed 13 of his 14 three-point shots) apparently didn’t carry to the high school season

POST OFFENSE

  • Pretty comfortable posting up smaller guys
    • Not just an empty bullet, seems to look to do so a couple of times a game
  • Has a patient approach operating with his back to the basket
  • Looks to set up basic right-handed hooks over the top but also flashed a turnaround fadeaway jumper with great fluidity

INDIVIDUAL DEFENSE

  • Continued to defend opposing point guards primarily and continued to prove himself capable of holding up well enough against smaller players full time
  • Works to go over picks at the point of attack
    • Hustle in pursuit to make plays from behind didn’t stand out as much as it had the previous season but Cunningham has plenty of good video showing his commitment to that task that it is clears he remains capable of acting as an impact defender in the pick-and-roll
  • Bends his knees to get down in a stance defending in isolation
    • Has shown to have several lateral slides in him in one direction to stay in out in space
    • Leverages the strength in his 215-pound frame to contain dribble penetration through contact consistently at the high school level
    • Has flashed lateral quickness to stay attached to smaller guards who can shake him side-to-side
    • Puts in the effort to contest pull-ups
    • Can block a shot defending on the ball

HELP DEFENSE

  • Often attentive to his responsibilities rotating in to pick up the roll man
    • Showed glimpses of explosive leaping ability to block shots coming off the weakside on longer rotations
  • Mixes it up on scrums
    • Helps crowd the area near the basket
    • Can block a shot from the side
    • Often looks to boxout whoever is close by
  • Closeouts, which had been better at the U19 World Cup than the previous season, left something to be desired again this past season

[1] According to ESPN

[2] DOB: Sep/25/2001

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Scottie Barnes Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Scottie Barnes was the fifth-ranked recruit in the 2020 high school class[1].

After spending the previous two years at NSU University School, the six-foot-eight combo forward transferred to powerhouse Montverde Academy for his senior year of high school and exceled as a star role player on a team so dominant that it was widely speculated as perhaps the greatest high school team ever.

He got to show the versatility of his defense, being able to switch and crossmatch onto perimeter players, as well as log some time at center in alternative lineups.

On offense, the soon-to-be 19-year-old[2] also plays a very attractive style as a shot creator for others on the move, even without handling against a set defense.

There are strong rumors that he’d like to convert into a point guard who does that sort of ball handling against a set defense and that Florida State convinced him to spend his pre-NBA year there in part by offering him a real chance to do so but Barnes projects as more of a connective tissue who can aid ball movement and people movement with handoffs, kickouts out of the short roll, quick ball reversals, by posting up to pass and by hitting cutters slipping backdoor off fake handoffs.

His shooting needs to develop but as the NBA rapidly paces towards a world where wings run pick-and-roll, wings space the floor and wings play center, players like Barnes should be in even higher demand.

ESPN ranked him 14th in its way-too-early 2021 mock draft.

PERIMETER DEFENSE

  • Picked up smaller players on switches a fair amount and checked wings on the perimeter from time-to-time
  • Bends his knees to get down in a stance
  • Defends on the ball with a good deal of intensity, capable of heating up opposing ball handlers of all sizes
  • Can stay attached to smaller players on straight-line drives and proved himself a quick off two feet to block shots at the rim defending on the ball
    • Projects as an option to hold up against guards who shake the defender side-to-side but wasn’t truly tested at the high school level and didn’t do as well as expected in these instances at the U19 World Cup one year ago
  • Showed urgency on his closeouts and proved himself quick enough to run the shooter off his shot and balanced enough to defend off the bounce
  • Was asked to extend conventional pick-and-roll coverage far beyond the foul line
    • Approached the pick-and-roll ball handler with urgency while showing at the three-point line
    • Proved capable of stopping the ball, impressing with his coordination and agility sliding laterally to prevent the ball handler from turning the corner right away off the pick

INTERIOR DEFENSE

  • Logged quite a bit of time at center when Day’ron Sharpe subbed out
    • 210-pound frame at age 19 suggests he’ll be strong enough to handle regular time at the position even as he moves up through the levels
  • Active help defender, stepping up to the front of the rim as the last line of defense and making longer rotations coming off the weakside in help defense
    • Quick leaper off two feet and rumored to have a nine-foot standing reach – can block a shot but didn’t stand out as a regular threat who gets those in volume and puts a lid on the rim
    • Guards with his arms up near the rim, walling up and making it challenging for opponents to finish over him
    • Impressed with his feel for the game making preventive rotations that denied dribble drives space towards driving all the way to the rim
    • Shadows post-ups and intervenes at the last second to block a shot
    • Did not show to be quick enough for multiple effort plays that required him to step up, force a drop-off and turn around quickly to challenge his man at the dunker spot
  • Showed so-so attention to his boxout responsibilities, at times being physical to protect his rebounding area but others missing the task of putting a body on whoever was close by
    • Did not stand out in terms of quickness chasing the ball off the rim

PASSING

  • Can trigger offense on grab-and-go’s off a defensive rebound, not just with basic ball reversals to initiate movement but by running tight pick-and-rolls at the elbow-extended area
    • Turns the corner, looks to engage the big defender, and has the dexterity to deliver quick passes off a live dribble to the roll man diving a step behind him
  • Pretty adept at delivering basic drop-offs and kickouts on the move off drawing two to the ball on straight-line drives
  • Flashed the ability to see the whole floor in one instance where passed crosscourt from one corner to a shooter drifting all the way to the other
  • Montverde didn’t do a lot of work through the elbows, but Barnes proved capable of acting as a hub to facilitate offense from around the same area against zone defenses
  • Posts up to pass and showed really good court vision scanning the floor while operating with his back to the basket
    • Can deliver diagonal passes to the opposite wing
    • Flashed quick touch passes against immediate double teams
  • Reckless passer at times

DRIVING

  • Can take it end-to-end on grab-and-go’s off a defensive rebound
  • Has a decent handle without being pressured and can turn the corner to attack the basket on side pick-and-rolls
    • Not an explosive leaper off one foot in traffic but impressed with his coordination euro-stepping his way through the crowd
    • Can launch a floater off a jump-stop but other than that, hasn’t yet developed many resources against rim protectors, most often acting as a basic up-and-down rim-level finisher
  • Doesn’t have a quick first step or much speed with the ball one-on-one
    • Has flashed some shiftiness going side-to-side but most often looked to play through contact on a straight line

FINISHING

  • So-so screener who jogs to screen on pick-and-rolls and hasn’t yet developed advanced techniques
  • Has decent lift of two feet without needing to load up to go up
  • Showed glimpses of very good touch on off-balance non-dunk finishes

SHOOTING

  • Spaced out to the three-point line only on occasion
  • Has a pretty mechanical release at this point of his development
    • Fully extends for a high release but needs time and space to set his feet and load his shot
    • Has no versatility to his release at this point of his development
  • Took a pull-up in an emergency late in the shot clock but doesn’t yet have the dexterity or the touch to act as any sort of a real threat to make jumpers off the bounce for now

[1] According to ESPN

[2] DOB: Jul/31/2001

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Day’Ron Sharpe Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Day’ron Sharpe was the 12th-ranked recruit in the 2020 high school class[1].

After leading South Central High School to a state title in North Carolina as a junior by averaging 16.5 points and 10.7 rebounds per game[2], the six-foot-10 center transferred to powerhouse Montverde Academy for his senior year.

He was primarily relied on to finish dump-offs around the rim but also got some chances to post-up a fair amount and to take a few three-pointers joining the offense late in transition.

On the other end, the Greenville native did well as a rim protector when able to park in front of the goal and flashed some nimbleness defending out in space but doesn’t seem like an option to extend pick-and-roll coverage above the foul line or be asked to cover a lot of space regularly.

He is joining North Carolina for next season and that seems like a good fit, given the nature of his 246-pound frame and that coaching staff’s preference for big men who are able to outmuscle their competition.

RIM PROTECTION

  • Fairly active stepping up to the front of the rim as the last line of defense
  • Quick leaper off two feet to challenge shots via verticality and a capable shot blocker
  • Lengthy enough to block shots on his way down
  • Impressed with his quickness leveraging his length to deflect passes near the rim
  • Didn’t stand out much in terms of making longer rotations coming off the weakside in help defense

PICK-AND-ROLL DEFENSE

  • Approaches the perimeter in more of a hunched down posture rather than bending his knees to get down in a proper stance
  • Showed some nimbleness sliding laterally while defending a face-up big man out at the three-point line in the game against Archbishop Carroll but doesn’t seem like an option to pick up smaller players on switches
  • Can keep pace with smaller ball handlers from the foul line down and proved capable of blocking a shot on the ball on occasion
  • Prone to losing the roll man behind him while dropping back on show-and-recover coverage

POST DEFENSE

  • Hustles to front the post and deny easy entry passes
  • Not as stout holding his ground as his 246-pound frame suggests he should be

OFFENSE

  • Main role within the offense was to finish dump-offs
    • Can go up with power off two feet with time and space to load up
    • Not as adept at finishing through contact as his strong frame suggests he could be
    • Showed pretty decent touch on non-dunk finishes
    • Impressed with glimpses of smart flashing to the front of the rim to create a passing lane for a teammate who had to cut his drive short
  • Got “Perk” touches[3] and also a few other opportunities to post up from time-to-time
    • Was able to set fairly deep post position consistently in high school
    • Basic post game most often looking for a right-handed hook, without much in terms of sleek footwork, fakes and drop-steps
    • Hasn’t shown much feel for feeling double teams, most often attempting to power through the crowd
    • Showed some ambition to face-up on some of these; tried to go on short drives but doesn’t have any sort of a dribble game at this point in his development, most often just attempting to power through his opponent and galloping into a two-foot leap
    • Took a no-dribble jumper at one point but isn’t yet a serious threat on those either
  • Was put in pick-and-roll a little bit
    • Widens his stance to try drawing contact on his picks but hasn’t yet developed much versatility to his screening
    • Showed glimpses of soft and quick hands catching the ball on the move
    • Can play above the rim as a target for lobs sneaking behind the defense
    • Unclear if he’s able to explode in a crowd diving down the middle of the lane
  • Took some open three-pointers while joining the offense late in transition
    • Hasn’t yet developed a lot of fluidity in his release, needing time and space to set his feet and load up his shot
    • Has a low release, launching the ball from out in front
    • Gets little elevation off the ground, seeming like a near set-shot
    • Can get a pretty good arc in his shot
    • Can make wide-open three-pointers from the high school line if left completely unbothered
    • Spaced out to the short corner on occasion but hasn’t yet developed a quick enough trigger to act as a real threat in these instances

[1] According to ESPN

[2] According to USA Basketball

[3] Running a straight post-up for your center in the first possession of the game

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Dariq Whitehead Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Dariq Whitehead is currently the ninth-ranked recruit in the 2022 high school class[1].

Yet to turn 16[2], the six-foot-five wing spent his first couple years of high basketball at Montverde Academy and as a sophomore earned a rotation role in a stacked team widely speculated as perhaps the greatest high school team ever.

With Cade Cunningham, Moses Moody, Zeb Jackson and Scottie Barnes moving on to college, Whitehead is in line for a more prominent role as a junior.

He was primarily a floor spacer last season, taking most of his shots on spot-ups, but also showed glimpses of potential as a slasher in garbage time and given Montverde’s track record at developing wing-sized ball handlers who can run pick-and-roll against a set defense[3], Whitehead could very well be next.

On the other end, his very well-developed 190-pound frame for someone his age and his proactivity trying to leverage his quick leaping ability helping at the rim suggest he could become the sort of defender who has the combination of physical profile and athletic ability to make an impact on the ball and as a help defender.

SHOOTING

  • Capable open-shot shooter
  • Fairly fluid shooting stroke, though need to dip for rhythm can look a bit to pronounced at times; gets little elevation off the ground but fully extends himself for a high release
  • Tends to miss long or short
  • Didn’t have many opportunities to show if he has much versatility to his release

CUTTING

  • Flashes of very smart cutting
  • Explosive leaper off two feet with time and space to load up
  • Can play above the rim as a target for lobs in transition, should be able to do so if asked to hunt for opportunities as a backdoor cutter in the half-court

DRIVING

  • Mostly handled on a few grab-and-go’s off a defensive rebound in transition but had opportunities to run some isolations in garbage time
    • Quick first step
    • Despite almost always being one of the youngest players on the floor, often managed to play through contact at the high school level
    • Loose handle – managed to get to the rim successfully on straight-line drives but struggled a little more in traffic and didn’t show much in terms of dribble moves
    • Explosive leaper off one foot in space – showcased thundering dunks in the half-court and sick windmill dunks in transition
    • Can hang and adjust his body in the air to unleash double-clutch finishes and reverses around rim protectors
    • Willing passer on drop-offs off engaging the last line of defense
  • Ran side pick-and-roll to keep the offense moving here and there
    • Flashed good feel for declining picks off a jab-step and exploding on a straight-line to the goal
    • Proved capable of delivering over the top to the roll man on clear reads

DEFENSE

  • Bends his knees to get down in a stance, moves his feet laterally to stay in front out in space and leverages his strength into containing dribble penetration through contact well while checking smaller guards
  • Struggled to navigate picks cleanly at the point of attack and didn’t impress in terms of hustling back in pursuit to make plays from behind
  • Stayed active away from the ball, stunting in to try clogging driving lanes
  • Can jump a passing lane but didn’t necessarily stand out as a ballhawk
  • Was active rotating to the basket, not just to help crowd the area near the rim, but attempting to make plays on the ball by challenging shots on flybys, taking a foul when necessary and picking up a block on occasion
  • Did not stand out in his contributions to the rebounding process

[1] According to ESPN

[2] DOB: Aug/1/2004

[3] Ben Simmons, D’Angelo Russell, RJ Barrett, Cade Cunningham

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

James Wiseman Scouting Report

CONTEXT

The top-ranked recruit in the 2019 high school class, James Wiseman ended up logging just 69 minutes with the University of Memphis this past season.

And even those 69 minutes were actually a bonus, considering they only took place under the protection of a restraining order a local judge in Tennessee issued against the NCAA’s decision to suspend Wiseman from the start of the college basketball season, something you don’t see very often.

The NCAA ruled him ineligible due to his long-standing connection with head coach Penny Hardaway, who assisted Wiseman’s family during a move from Nashville to Memphis a couple of years ago, so he could then enroll at Memphis East High School, where Hardaway coached before getting hired by the University of Memphis.

The NCAA and Memphis eventually negotiated a 12-game suspension to be served after the team’s loss to Oregon, its most anticipated non-conference game of the season, but soon thereafter Wiseman realized that a prospect of his caliber does not need to jump through hoops for the NCAA’s benefit and left the school to focus entirely on preparing for the draft.

As was the case with Darius Garland last year, missing essentially the entire season is unlikely to hurt his stock in any meaningful way, as ESPN currently ranks him third on its top 100 and buzz of him maybe ending up the top pick depending on which team wins the lottery remains.

That’s the case because Wiseman showed in his time at Memphis East and his appearance at the Nike Hoop Summit a year ago potential to become a pure center who is special enough to escape the league’s deemphasizing of the position over these last few years.

Part of it is physical talent. Wiseman measured at six-foot-11 without shoes, with a seven-foot-four wingspan and a 247-pound frame in the Memphis Pro Day. Those are elite measurements for a 20-year-old. He’s also athletic, in terms of elevating quickly off the ground to make plays at the rim on both ends and flashing some coordination with the ball on face-up drives.

Another part of it is the flashes of skill he’s shown as a passer on the move and as an outside shooter, which suggests he could be useful to assist the ball movement process and/or help space the floor on occasion, though there is no data to support those impressions, given he’s never shot well or recorded all that many assists in the higher profile events he’s participated in.

His three NCAA appearances took place against South Carolina State (which ended up losing 18 of its 29 games in the season), Illinois-Chicago (which ended up losing half of its games) and Oregon (which ended up winning 24 of its 31 games). In those, Wiseman averaged 34.2 points per 40 minutes on 76.3% effective shooting and compiled a 47.8 PER.

But despite those video game numbers, his brief cup of coffee in college really only served to suggest that some of his more ambitious adventures on offense (face-up driving from the top of the key and shooting on the move) will probably be phased out of his game as he moves up through the levels, as his offense was entirely based on attempting to overwhelm the competition with his size around the rim.

Wiseman was able to show more promising traits on the other end, mostly in help defense, where his activity near the rim translated right away, but also in pick-and-roll coverage, especially against Illinois-Chicago, when he was able to extend pick-and-roll coverage far beyond the foul line and contest a pull-up three-pointer effectively, though it’s noteworthy that his least impressive performance was against Oregon, which was by far the best team he played against.

Check the rest of the post at RealGM

David Johnson Scouting Report

CONTEXT

  • 78th-ranked recruit in the 2019 high school class[1]
  • Six-foot-five point-guard who I project as more of a caretaker in the pros but who got to the rim in volume and shot well on long-twos, even if on a low number of attempts, so there’s potential for him develop into more than that
  • First year at Louisville can be viewed through two prisms: the game against Duke and all the other games
    • Slashed his way through the lane all game long and consistently broke down the defense to the tune of 19 points and seven assists in 28 minutes at Cameron Indoor Stadium, while leading the Cardinals to a six-point win
    • The other 25 appearances were not as impressive, as he shot poorly from almost anywhere on the floor (52.5% true shooting[2]), turned the ball over a ton (4.7 turnovers per 40 minutes) and fouled like crazy on defense (4.3 personal fouls per 40 minutes), which limited him to just 16.6 minutes per game as a freshman
  • At his best, proved capable of creating for himself and others in volume in his smaller role leading alternate lineups – logging 25.5% usage rate and assisting on 37.7% of Louisville’s scores in his 431 minutes
  • Ranked 17th on ESPN’s way-too-early 2021 mock draft

PICK&ROLL OFFENSE

  • Doesn’t have an explosive first step or much straight-line speed but has a mix of fluidity and craft that results in a fairly versatile approach in pick-and-roll
  • Can split double teams at the point of attack to get downhill right away off the pick or more patiently manipulate his man towards the screen with crossovers and in-and-out dribbles
  • Impressed with court vision on the move
    • Hits the roll man over the top and with well-timed pocket passes
    • Able to launch crosscourt passes from the elbow to the opposite side off a live dribble against the momentum of his body
    • Can deliver wraparound hammer passes off getting deep into the lane
    • Averaged 7.0 assists per 40 minutes
  • Was as much of threat to attack the basket as he was to pass off dribble penetration when he touched the paint, impressing with his fluidity while employing hesitation moves and spins to maneuver his way through traffic
    • Averaged 7.1 shots at the rim per 40 minutes, with those close-range tries accounting for 53.5% of his live-ball attempts[3]
    • Not an explosive leaper off one foot in traffic but can go up strong off galloping into a two-foot leap
    • Glimpses of very appealing versatility finishing through and around rim protectors with a mix of body control, flexibility, and dexterity; shot- and head-fakes, under-handed right-handed finishes through contact, left-handed reverses and extended left-handed finger-rolls
    • Shot just 58.4% in his 77 attempts at the rim but his average of 4.2 makes at the rim per 40 minutes would be a top 10 mark among NCAA guards ranked on ESPN’s top 100 for the 2020 Draft
    • Hasn’t yet developed a knack for earning the benefit of the whistle – earning just 3.7 foul shots per 40 minutes
    • Quite turnover prone driving through traffic – coughing it up on 23.8% of his possessions
  • Hit and miss against big men on switches as well. Has some side-to-side shake and managed to get around stiffs well enough but struggled against more athletic types
  • Not a killer shot maker at this point of his development and the touch on his floater comes and goes but had good numbers when bottled up in the in-between area with step-back pull-ups, going between the legs into a pull-up in rhythm, runners and floaters off a jump-stop;
    • Shot 47.7% of his 44 two-point shots away from the basket

FLOOR-SPACING

  • Catch-and-shoot stroke does not look necessarily broken, as he fully extends himself for a high release and goes through clean mechanics with good balance when left unbothered, but shot poorly from long-range and consistently looked hesitant to pull the trigger
    • Missed 18 of his 23 three-point shots as a freshman
  • Shot poorly from the foul line (60% on 40 attempts), which raises some concerns regarding his touch

DEFENSE

  • Given his size, offers the versatility to toggle between defending opposing point guards in alternate lineups and acting as a weakside defender when he shared the court with Darius Perry
  • Bends his knees to get down in a stance and showed decent side-to-side quickness to stay in front of smaller players out in space but did not often leverage his 210-pound frame to contain dribble penetration through contact
  • Puts in the work to go over picks at the point of attack and hustles in pursuit to contest shots from behind
  • Has decent instincts and reaction quickness making plays in the passing lanes but not at an especially impressive level
  • Active help defender, not just crowding the area near the basket but stepping up to the front of the rim as the last line of defense and challenging shots via verticality when he’s the lowest defender close to the baseline, as well as making plays on the ball from the side on longer rotations coming off the weakside
    • Blocked seven shots in 431 minutes last season
    • Averaged 4.3 personal fouls per 40 minutes
  • Pitched in on the glass but not an especially impressive level
    • Collected 12% of opponents’ misses when he was on the floor

[1] According to ESPN

[2] According to Real GM

[3] According to hoop-math

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Olivier Sarr Scouting Report

Oliver Sarr’s move to Kentucky marks one of the highest profile transfers of the college basketball offseason.

It’s still unclear if the seven-foot center born in Toulouse will be eligible for next season, as his attempt to get clearance without having to sit out one year seems to be based entirely on the fact that Danny Manning was let go at Wake Forest, where Sarr spent his first three years upon moving to the United States after developing during his mid-teens at INSEP – the famous French athletics program.

He averaged 14.8 points per 40 minutes on 55.2% true shooting and 11 rebounds per 40 minutes in 85 appearances these last three seasons but made a bigger leap in prominence after averaging 20.5 points per 40 minutes on 59.6% true shooting and recording a 26.4 PER in 802 minutes this past year[1].

Under Manning’s guidance, the 21-year-old[2] developed as a post scorer and was the focal point of Wake Forest’s interior-driven attack last season – logging 24.2% usage rate and scoring over a third of his makes from two-point range unassisted[3].

Though not usually very physical attempting to set deep position, he manages to get a good enough seal in the mid-post or lower against his age group due to the nature of his 235-pound frame.

Sarr has a patient approach operating with his back to the basket, which can at times look too methodical. He doesn’t often go for quick moves or power moves, rarely attempting to leverage his general size into overwhelming less-physically developed opponents but nonetheless getting the benefit of the whistle quite a bit – averaging nine foul shots per 40 minutes this past season.

It’s more common to see him trying to show his sleek-ish footwork with spin moves, basic turnaround hooks and the occasional running hook. Those moves tend to look mechanical. His touch, with either hand, is decent but nothing substantially above average, as he shot 66.9% on 127 shots at the rim and 40.5% on 126 two-point shots away from the rim last season.

Sarr is also fond of facing up, jab-stepping and attempting a near-standstill outside shot on occasion but hasn’t looked all that promising in that area.

He will at times drive out of these face-ups, as well as on catches out of roll-and-replace and flashing to the foul line. Though Sarr has shown a little bit of coordination putting the ball on the floor in these instances, he is slow and doesn’t have any sort of lift elevating off one foot in traffic, shiftiness to shake his man side-to-side or dexterity pulling up off the bounce.

Sarr will attempt a three-pointer every once in a while out of these roll-and-replace catches but hasn’t yet developed into any sort of a threat to space the floor capably and regularly – missing 36 of his 47 three-point shots over his time in the NCAA.

In pick-and-roll, he’s shown to be a basic screener who hasn’t yet developed advanced techniques but who looks to draw contact and can dislodge on-ball defenders from ball-handlers fairly well when he plants his feet.

Sarr has shown glimpses of soft hands catching the ball on the move but nothing particularly impressive in terms of touch on non-dunk finishes in a crowd. He can play above the rim as a target for lobs sneaking behind the defense but needs time and space to load up before going up strong, yet to prove he can elevate quickly enough and explosively enough while rolling down the middle.

Sarr has flashed some coordination not to crash into the help on hard rolls, as well as some dexterity catching the ball around the foul line, dribbling for balance, and kicking out off engaging a help defender.

He hasn’t yet developed into a real asset helping facilitate for others, though, not on the move, not out of drawing double-teams in the post, not acting as a connective tissue while handling in the high post – assisting on just 8% of Wake Forest’s scores when he was on the floor, with a 0.6 assist-to-turnover ratio.

Sarr is at his most efficient on offense in the offensive glass, where he’s shown a knack for setting inside position and good instincts reacting to the ball quicker than the competition, besides the fact he’s able to reach it at a higher point than most opponents due to his standing reach and the fact he has flashed a surprising quick second jump – collecting 11.4% of Wake Forest’s misses when he was on the floor last season and converting his 29 putback attempts at a 73.1% clip.

On the other glass, Sarr was dominant. He allowed inside position on occasion but proved himself attentive to his boxout responsibilities and played with a little more toughness than he showed in other areas, not just putting a body on whoever was close by but often doing so physically to clear out his rebounding area – collecting 26.1% of opponents’ misses when he was in the game last season.

That edge in holding his ground could also be seen in post defense, where Sarr looked stout, besides keeping in mind to guard with his arms up near the rim to discourage opponents from attempting to finish over him.

Sarr had good moments as an effective presence defending closer to the basket. He’s shown a knack for making preventive rotations that deny space for a ball handler towards driving all the way to the basket and regularly blocked baseline paths to the goal.

Sarr averaged 26.7 minutes per game for a team that allowed opponents to take just 34.5% of live-ball attempts at the rim, a mark that ranked in the top third in the country last season[4].

He is active stepping to the front of the rim as the last line of defense and regularly challenged shots via verticality but at times didn’t seem strong enough to disrupt athletic finishers when they met in the air.

Sarr also doesn’t look quick enough for plays that require multiple efforts, where he’s needed to step up, force a drop-off and then turnaround to challenge his man going up out of the dunker spot.

He hasn’t stood out as a threat to block shots in volume, despite his size and length – averaging just 1.8 blocks per 40 minutes across the last three seasons. Wake Forest allowed 64% shooting at the rim last season, a mark that ranked 317th in the nation, which is not necessarily all on Sarr but doesn’t reflect well on his ability to anchor an above average effort defending the goal.

His average of 4.7 personal fouls per 40 minutes is pretty discouraging too.

He was asked to defend the pick-and-roll with a mix of dropbacks and hedges, while also finding himself switching against smaller players on occasion to make up for an on-ball defender getting stuck on the screen for too long.

On dropbacks, Sarr goes up at most a step beyond the foul line and does not approach the ball handler often, just giving up the pull-up jumper in these instances. When the ball handler doesn’t take that rhythm pull-up, Sarr has shown somewhat unexpected fluidity backpedaling and has proven himself capable of keeping pace with smaller players foul line down to discourage them from attempting to finish over or around him.

Perhaps more surprisingly, Sarr showed pretty good quickness defending the pick-and-pop here and there, able to run stretch big men who need time to load up their jumpers out of their shots more than a few times.

On hedges, he did well influencing ball handlers way high on the perimeter but lacks the speed to recover back in a timely manner.

On switches, Sarr bends his knees to get down in a stance and had some promising possessions flashing some lateral agility against guards who didn’t have much side-to-side quickness. Against these types, he couldn’t necessarily stay in front to force a pull-up but managed to stay attached well enough to discourage them from attempting to finish over or around him.

But despite his pretty decent balance for a seven-footer defending off the bounce, Sarr doesn’t seem like a real option to pick up truly quick smaller guards one-on-one, as those types with real north-south speed managed to just beat him on the first step and get to the goal before he could get to them from behind.


[1] According to sports-reference

[2] DOB: 2/20/1999

[3] According to hoop-math

[4] According to hoop-math

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara