Eric Paschall Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Eric Paschall was only the 112th-ranked prospect in the 2014 high school class but has managed to work his way into NBA consideration heading into his senior season, as ESPN’s Jonathan Givony has him ranked 20th in his latest mock draft.

After one year at Fordham, he transferred to Villanova, where he’s been a rotation player for the past couple of years and played a key role on the team that won the national championship last season, while averaging 14.2 points per 40 minutes on 60% effective shooting and putting together a 17.2 PER in 38 appearances.

The soon-to-be 22-year-old certainly looks the part for what the league is looking for in its combo forwards from physical and athletic standpoints, as he is listed at six-foot-eight and 255 pounds, while showing pleasing agility for someone with his frame.

He’s proven to be very useful on defense: capable of credibly defending players of different sizes – via switching onto smaller guys midway through the shot clock or cross-matching for entire possessions in terms of playing up a position. Paschall has also shown he can not only execute the scheme away from the ball but might even develop into a potentially impactful help defender down the line.

The corners regard the other end, where he’s been merely a capable open-shot shooter up until this point. The Dobbs Ferry, New York native hasn’t yet shown any dynamism as a shot creator and though he has flashed explosive leaping ability from time-to-time, Paschall was not deployed as a roller who can offer a vertical threat near the rim, so he figures to be a weak-side floor-spacer in the pros.

(Check the rest of the post at RealGM)

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De’Andre Hunter Scouting Report

CONTEXT

De’Andre Hunter was the 77th-ranked prospect in the 2016 high school class.

After redshirting his first year at Virginia, he went on to average 18.4 points per 40 minutes on 58.4% true shooting and put together a 22.1 PER in 33 appearances last season.

Though he logged just 657 total minutes, the 20-year-old was a key cog on the team that finished second in the nation in adjusted efficiency margin and won ACC Sixth Man of the Year honors.

Despite the fact he broke his wrist during the conference tournament and missed the team’s loss to Maryland-Baltimore County in the NCAA Tournament, draftniks were enthused with the idea of him entering this year’s class but Hunter opted to return for his sophomore season without even testing the waters.

The Philadelphia native looks the part of what the NBA is looking for in a two-way combo forward these days, which is why he is currently considered the ninth-ranked prospect in the 2019 draft class.

Listed at six-foot-seven with a chiseled 222-pound frame and rumored to have a seven-foot-two wingspan, Hunter has enough size and has shown to be tough enough to hold his own against bulkier types in the post and the defensive glass.

He is also mobile and agile enough to defend true perimeter players out in space, aside from offering versatility in pick-and-roll coverage.

On the other end, the Friends Central School alum has operated as a hub to facilitate offense from the elbow area for the most part, as he’s played as a big on Virginia’s two-post system, but has also shown he can take his man one-on-one from the foul line down and that he has a projectable outside shot – even if he didn’t space out to the three-point line as much you’d like.

(Check the rest of the post at RealGM)

Keldon Johnson Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Keldon Johnson was the seventh-ranked prospect in the 2018 high school class and was considered the 14th-ranked prospect in the 2019 draft prior to Kentucky’s preseason tour in the Bahamas but after his performance in the Caribbean island, he is expected to rise up the boards.

Listed at six-foot-six and 211 pounds, Johnson looks the part of a 3&D wing from a physical-standpoint and based on how he was used last week, it seems this will be the role the 18-year-old will be asked to fill in Lexington as well – given the depth of options the Wildcats have to handle in the perimeter and the more modern motion offense they appear to intend to install for this year.

Only nine of his 40 shots were three-point attempts but he regularly spot-up beyond the arc as a weak-side floor-spacer in the half-court and got most of his touches on the side of the floor – via Iverson cuts and running pick-and-rolls off dribble-handoffs to keep the offense moving.

Johnson averaged 22 points per 40 minutes on 52.5% shooting in the four games against the Bahamas National Team, San Lorenzo, Mega Bemax and a team built with a group of free agents from Toronto.

On the other end, the teenager showed to be a solid individual defender at this stage of his development and impressed with his ability to execute the scheme away from the ball. That said, athletes of his caliber are usually expected to be disrupting forces flying around to create events but that’s not what Johnson showed during this four-game set.

(Check the rest of the post at RealGM)

Sekou Doumbouya Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Sekou Doumbouya is the top-ranked European prospect born in 2000 and currently considered the third-ranked prospect in the 2019 draft class.

The 17-year-old exploded into the scene 16 months ago, when he averaged 21.6 points and 11.1 rebounds per 40 minutes at the 2016 U18 FIBA European Championships while he was yet to turn 16 at the time of the tournament.

Since then, the teenager hasn’t played for the French National Team at the youth level these past two summers due to injury but has already become a full time pro in the meantime.

INSEP loaned him to Poitiers 86 these last two seasons and Doumbouya logged 59 appearances in the French Pro B. Poitiers didn’t move up to first division, losing 23 of its 34 games last season, but Doumbouya is transferring to CSP Limoges this offseason and will experience the French Pro A this next year.

The Conakry, Guinea native of French citizenship is very well developed for someone his age from a physical-standpoint – sporting a chiseled 230-pound frame. Thanks to that, he was a legit rotation player at Poitiers – starting 24 of his 28 appearances and averaging 23.2 minutes per game last season.

He was developed as a wing for the most part, which was surprising considering he excelled at that 2016 U18 FIBA European Championships playing as a big man – leveraging his athletic ability as a threat near the basket on both ends.

The six-foot-nine combo forward spent most of his time as a weak-side floor-spacer, taking 38.8% of his shots from three-point range last season, but was also given a few chances to isolate on catches off dribble-handoffs on the side of the floor and even run the eventual middle high pick-and-roll against a set defense.

He is an inefficient scorer and unreliable shot creator for others at this point of his development – averaging 14.6 points per 40 minutes on 45% effective shooting and assisting on just 8.3% of Poitiers’ scores when he was on the floor last season. But his jumper looks better than his percentages suggest and he remains an impressive athlete on lob finishes.

On the other end, Doumbouya was asked to defend in a multitude of ways. He can execute the scheme as a weak-side help-defender and is capable enough in isolation defense against similarly-sized players out in space but disappointed in terms of flying around to create events and doesn’t seem suited to pick up smaller players on switches regularly.

(Check the rest of the post at RealGM)

RJ Barrett Scouting Report

CONTEXT

RJ Barrett was the top prospect in the 2018 high school class and is currently considered to be the top prospect in the 2019 draft class.

From a physical-standpoint, the 18-year-old looks like someone who could log NBA minute right now due to his chiseled six-foot-seven, 202-pound frame. As a result of his advanced athletic development, he has already debuted for the Canadian National Team at the senior level in the latest World Cup Qualifiers window – in appearances against the Dominican Republican and the Virgin Islands.

In large part thanks to that overwhelming edge in athleticism in comparison to his age group, the swingman dominated in high school and led Montverde Academy to a “mythical” national championship in late March.

Barrett handled the ball in middle high pick-and-roll a lot less than when he’s had the chance to play with the Canadian National Team at the youth level but got plenty of opportunities to create against a set defense in isolation out of ball reversals and jogging to the ball for dribble-handoffs on the side of the floor. As a weak-side floor-spacer, his shot remains a mixed bag.

On the other end, Barrett acted mostly as a weak-side defender and used his length to fly around passing lanes from time-to-time. His position defense was solid as well and he put in the effort to execute the scheme. More interestingly, perhaps, Barrett picked up smaller players on switches every once in a while and showed he has room to become a capable defender at the point of attack.

(Check the rest of the post at RealGM)

Will Clyburn Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Will Clyburn is a 28-year-old[1] veteran who is said to want to sign with an NBA team this offseason after spending his five years as a pro accumulating 7,221minutes of experience in the German BBL, the Israeli BSL, the Turkish BSL, the VTB United League, the Eurochallenge, the Eurocup and the Euroleague[2].

Most recently, the six-foot-six versatile wing averaged 19 points per 40 minutes on 57.4% true shooting and compiled a 17.2 PER in 64 appearances for CSKA Moscow last season – as a key cog on the team that won the VTB United League and made the Euroleague Final Four.

The Detroit native had a multi-dimensional role within CSKA’s motion offense, having the chance to do a little bit of everything. Other than spacing the floor, he got plenty of chances to isolate out of ball reversals, post-up smaller matchups and run small-small pick-and-pops designed to get him downhill on straight line drives.

On the other end, the Iowa State alum looks the part and can do his job reasonably well in aspects related to movement but disappointed with his lack of physicality against power wings or bigger players and doesn’t leverage his athleticism to fly around creating events, though his rebounding was a saving grace.

OFFENSE

Clyburn took only 25.9% of his shots from three-point range last season but that’s still the most important part of his game.

He has an unorthodox release that looks like a catapult at times but the ball went in enough for him to effective as an open shot shooter this past year – nailing 40.8% of his three-point shots, though at a pace of just 3.5 such attempts per 40 minutes.

Clyburn gets little elevation off the ground but his release point leads to a high arcing shot, so he is able to shoot over on-ball contests and closeouts more often than not.

That was a dot outside the curve, though. The previous four years Clyburn hit just 29.3% of his 556 three-point shots.

As is, the majority of his value comes via his ability to create for himself off the dribble. He can grab-and-go off defensive rebounds to trigger offense or just take his man one-and-one in no-pass possessions.

Clyburn doesn’t have an explosive first step and his handle is pretty basic. But he is faster than you’d expected with the ball and has shown to be somewhat resourceful getting into the lane or creating separation.

Clyburn can pivot into a well coordinated spin move in a pinch and has shown some shiftiness unleashing between-the-legs crossovers to shift directions and shake his man off balance. He is also strong enough thanks to his 210-pound frame to maintain his balance and his momentum forward through contact.

Clyburn is a capable shot-maker on step-back pull-ups but does most of his damage getting all the way to the basket. Besides getting by his man in isolation, he can also do it via small-small pick-and-pops that open up driving lanes for him to get downhill and attack the last line of defense from a position of strength – earning 6.6 foul shots per 40 minutes last season.

Clyburn can go up strong off two feet with some space to load up and play above the rim as a target for lobs sneaking behind the defense on backdoor cuts but is a rim-level finisher going up off the dribble. He can adjust his body in the air, has nice touch over-extending on finger-roll finishes with either hand and proved he is able to do it through contact.

Clyburn also has a righty floater to score over length from the in-between area, overall hitting 49.6% of his 405 two-point shots last season.

He can make a kick-out pass over the top in traffic but has rarely shown anything particularly impressive in terms of court vision on the move – assisting on just 11.3% of CSKA’s scores when he was on the floor last season.

Clyburn can also dribble his way into posting up smaller matchups from time-to-time. He is more often than not only looking for a basic right-handed hook, though, and has so-so feel against double teams as well.

DEFENSE

Clyburn hunches rather than bends his knees getting down in a stance but can move laterally reasonably well to stay in front of similarly-sized players and contest pull-ups as well as he can in isolation.

He struggled holding his ground against power wings in the post, though. Due to that lack of physicality and toughness, he is not a good option to pick up bigger players on switches regularly.

Clyburn is also not suited to chase shooters around the floor, as he doesn’t play with enough intensity in pursuit and can’t slide around picks cleanly. That inability to navigate screens also prevents him from being an option to cross-match or pick up smaller players on switches regularly.

He can be relied on to execute the scheme, as he is attentive enough to reverse switches on the fly, to his responsibilities coming off the weak-side to help crowd the area near the basket and can pick up the eventual shot block once in a blue moon – averaging 0.5 blocks per 40 minutes last season.

His instincts to leverage his length and athletic ability making plays in the passing lanes were fairly disappointing (1.1 steals per 40 minutes) but Clyburn did put in the effort pitching in on the glass, taking advantage of the excellent boxout work by Kyle Hines, Andrey Vorotsevich and Semen Antonov – collecting 20.5% of opponents’ misses when he was on the floor last season.


[1] DOB: 5/17/1990

[2] According to RealGM

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

James Nunnally Scouting Report

CONTEXT

James Nunnally is a 27-year-old[1] veteran who is expected to sign with an NBA team this offseason after spending his six years as a pro accumulating 7,204 minutes of experience in the G-League, the Greek HEBA 1, the Puerto Rican BSN, the Israeli BSL, the Spanish ACB, the Italian Lega A, the Turkish BSL and the Euroleague[2].

Most recently, the six-foot-seven sharpshooter averaged 18.8 points per 40 minutes on 67% effective shooting and compiled an 18.3 PER in 56 appearances for Fenerbahçe last season, as a key cog on the team that won the Turkish BSL and made it to the Euroleague title game.

His primary role on offense was as a weak-side floor-spacer – logging just 20.2% usage rate and taking 54.5% of his live-ball attempts from three-point range, though the Stockton, California native also proved he is able to run side pick-and-roll to keep the offense moving, turn the corner off a hand-off and post up smaller matchups in a pinch.

On the other end, he acted as a weak-side defender for the most part and proved he can be relied on to execute the scheme but Fenerbahçe switched quite aggressively towards the end of the season, so the University of California at Santa Barbara alum also got to defend smaller players somewhat regularly, which he didn’t prove to be particularly well-suited for.

SHOOTING

Nunnally fully extends himself for a high release and has a quick enough trigger to get his catch-and-shoot three-pointers off prior to closeouts, though he didn’t seem as capable when a lengthy defender forced him to rush through his mechanics.

He took some shots relocating after getting into the lane and kicking out, as well as drifting around the wing and to the corner. Nunnally also looks good taking one-dribble pull-ups off an escape dribble against flyby closeouts.

But his best work is still off spot-ups, as he hasn’t shown to have the body flexibility and a dynamic enough release to be asked to take tough shots on the move often.

Nunnally nailed 45.4% of his 847 three-point shots over the last five seasons, at a pace of 6.8 such attempts per 40 minutes, including 52% of his 400 looks from beyond the arc these past couple of years. He also hit 86.8% of his 448 free throws during the five-year span.

OFF DRIBBLE OFFENSE

Nunnally can run side pick-and-roll to keep the offense moving and proved adept at taking dribble-in pull-ups off hop footwork and snaking his way around the screen to create separation for step-back pull-ups.

He keeps his dribble alive and also showed enough court vision to make crosscourt passes to the opposite side – assisting on 13.9% of Fenerbahçe’s scores when he was on the floor last season.

Nunnally can get all the way to the basket on straight line drives curling off dribble-handoffs. Though he is not an explosive leaper off one foot or two feet in traffic and can act as an up-and-down finisher, Nunnally can over-extend for finger-roll layups, proved to be strong enough to finish on his way down and has a running floater to score over length from the in-between area.

He also flashed the ability to dribble into post-ups against smaller matchups, most often looking to pass out of it to a shooter sprinting to an open spot or set up a basic turnaround lean-in jumper.

DEFENSE

Nunnally does OK defending his own position for the most part.

He can bend his knees to get down in a stance, has multiple lateral slides in him to stay in front of similarly sized players in isolation and can use the strength in his 220-pound frame to play stout post defense against power wings – suggesting he could be an option to steal some minutes as the second biggest player on the floor in smaller lineups, which he wasn’t asked to do at Fenerbahçe.

Nunally also proved he can be relied on to stunt-and-recover when Fenerbahçe had its big men hedging against the pick-and-roll and can use his length to get into passing lanes for some takeaways – averaging 1.4 steals per 40 minutes last season.

His contribution on the glass was fairly disappointing, though – as he collected just 11% of opponents’ misses when he was on the floor last season. He struggles to chase shooters off screens as well – lacking the foot speed and the type of body frame suited to slide around picks cleanly.

That also proved to be a problem when Nunnally picked up smaller players on switches. He bends his knees to get down in a stance but is unable to go over screens at the point of attack, gets blown by an unsettling amount in isolation and doesn’t hustle in pursuit to try challenging shots and passes from behind.


[1] DOB: 7/14/1990

[2] According to RealGM

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara