Undersized Big

Noah Dickerson Scouting Report

Noah Dickerson seemed at Montverde like he could develop into an interesting player; a potential stretch five with enough mobility to guard pick-and-rolls above the foul line regularly and protect the rim by leveraging his size, if not necessarily as a constant threat to block shots.

But this has not materialized in his time at Washington.

Dickerson has taken just five three-point shots in his 51 appearances in college and isn’t used to help facilitate offense from the elbows, despite the fact he’s flashed some semblance of ball skills that could be of use on dribble hand-offs.

Dickerson doesn’t have enough explosiveness elevating off two feet to play above the rim as a target for lobs but could do well enough as a finisher out of pick-and-roll because he’s a good screener who looks to draw contact, has nice touch around the basket and can finish through contact. But he’s spent most of his minutes this season with another big in the lineup, so there’s often not enough space for him to roll hard to the basket.

Dickerson’s post game hasn’t improved much either. Often matched up against power forwards, the 245-pounder can get a deep seal below the foul line and rely on power moves to bully his way into short attempts near the basket or draw fouls – averaging 7.1 foul shots per 40 minutes so far this season, according to basketball-reference.

His footwork can also look fluid at times but for the most part he’s quite robotic with his moves and hasn’t shown anything in terms of a turnaround jumper or passing out of the low post – assisting on just 6% of Washington’s scores when he’s been on the floor.

Dickerson is just fourth on the team in usage rate, finishing only a fifth of the team’s possessions when he is in the game. When he’s not screening for the ball-handler, Dickerson mostly spots up on the baseline and waits for drop-offs. As mentioned above, he doesn’t have a lot of vertical explosion to go up strong in a pinch but can finish through contact – converting his 66 shots at the basket at a 66.7% clip, according to hoop-math.

Positioned close the rim, Dickerson can also make an impact on the offensive glass. He could play with a higher motor to be more of a difference maker but can consistently set inside position against college power forwards and has a seven-foot-one wingspan to rebound outside of his area – collecting 11.2% of Washington’s misses when he’s been on the floor. Dickerson doesn’t have much of a second jump to go back immediately, though, transforming just 62.5% of his second chances into putbacks.

Defensively, Dickerson doesn’t always get low to defend the pick-and-roll in a stance but still has appealing mobility for a big man – able to extend his coverage beyond the foul line and wall off dribble penetration, though he still hasn’t developed enough quickness to pick up smaller players on switches regularly.

Dickerson makes his rotations from time to time but is not consistent enough making himself a presence to crowd the area near the basket regularly, can’t act as a credible shot blocking threat and is foul prone – as he’s averaged 4.5 personal fouls per 40 minutes.

His biggest impact comes on the glass, where he is attentive to his boxout responsibilities and shows good instincts tracking the ball off the rim, collecting 24.1% of opponents’ misses when he’s been on the floor.

Editor’s Note: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Advertisements
Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s