3D wing

Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk Scouting Report

CONTEXT

It took two years but Sviatoslav Mykhailiuyk has finally become a more prominent rotation player at Kansas, as he’s averaged 26.9 minutes per game this season.

He still hasn’t been given any opportunity to handle the ball against a set defense, though. His role on this team is as a weak-side spot-up shooter without any sort of shot creation responsibility, posting only a 18.1% usage rate.

The six-foot-eight wing impressed running offense at the Eurocamp last summer and had already shown some potential on the ball prior to joining Kansas. But since it’s unclear how well his skill-set has developed over the last two-and-a-half years, his draft stock has consistently declined over time, despite his size and youth (he’ll still only turn 20 in June).

Draft Express currently ranks him 46th in its top 100.

WEAK-SIDE OFFENSE

58.8% of his shots have been three-pointers this season. His release is not as lightning quick as you’d expect for a specialist like him but he tends to get the ball off comfortably enough before an opponent can closeout and contest his shot effectively.

Mykhailiuk’s flashed the ability to come off screens and hit pull-up three-pointers off side pick-and-rolls but is mostly only used on spot-ups. He’s nailed 42.5% of his 87 three-point shots this season, while averaging 7.6 attempts per 40 minutes. Through his 1,197 minutes in college, Mykhailiuk’s been a 38.5% three-point shooter on 7.7 attempts per 40 minutes.

He can’t turn the corner on dribble-handoffs but attacks closeouts very fluidly and gets all the way to the basket against a scrambling defense a fair amount considering his role, as he’s averaged 3.2 shots at the rim per 40 minutes – according to data researched at hoop-math.

Mykhailiuk lacks lift to get up strong off one foot in traffic, lacks length for reverses or extended finishes against rim protectors and hasn’t shown anything in terms of being able to finish through contact – converting just 59.5% of his shots at the basket and averaging only 1.8 foul shots per 40 minutes.

He’s proven himself to be a very good passer on the move, though. Mykhailiuk has pretty good court vision sucking in the defense and kicking out to a spot-up shooter on the strong side or dropping off to a big man at the dunker’s spot – assisting on 10.8% of Kansas’ scores when he’s been on the floor throughout his collegiate career, according to basketball-reference.

Mykhailiuk is also an asset on baseline cuts, showing very good feel to take advantage of an unaware defender. He can play above the rim as a target for lobs elevating out of two feet and more than half of his 22 makes at the rim have been assisted.

DEFENSE

Mykhailiuk is a decent team defender, always with a foot in the lane when he’s guarding on the weak-side and rotating in to help crowd the area near the basket. He lacks the athletic ability to make much of an impact, though – unable to run shooters off the three-point line consistently, lacking length to contest shots effectively and contributing very little through blocks and defensive rebounds.

Mykhailiuk also doesn’t have much athleticism to do well as an individual defender. He gets on a stance and has decent lateral quickness to stay in front of similarly-sized players but can’t contain dribble penetration through contact and is not a viable option to pick up smaller players on switches, as he’s unable to go over screens that well.

At his height, Mykhailiuk could be considered an option to spend some minutes at stretch four on smaller lineups but lacks strength in his 205-pound frame hold ground in the post or boxout true big men.

According to basketball-reference, he has the second lowest defensive rating on the team among rotation players.

Editor’s Note: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

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