Isaiah Todd Scouting Report

Isaiah Todd’s first year as a pro felt like a productive one.

The 15th-ranked prospect in the 2020 high school class[1], the six-foot-10 stretch big opted to sign with the start-up G-League Ignite instead of an NCAA program for last season.

He was speculated as a prospect who hadn’t progressed in his development as much as hoped for in his final couple of years in high school, but it seems like his time in the G-League set him a clear path forward.

There were some questions about how a program specifically built for four players (Jalen Green, Jonathan Kuminga, Daishen Nix and Todd) would approach distribution of roles and opportunities in a real basketball setting, but they were answered in a very satisfying manner, in my opinion.

Todd, for example, was primarily a floor spacer who didn’t have much shot creation responsibility and was largely protected by a center, and that was the case because he hasn’t yet developed much in terms of shot creation skills and couldn’t protect the rim.

But he didn’t just park beyond the arc on offense and had no responsibilities on defense. The 19-year-old[2] had a fair number of opportunities to launch mid-range jumpers out of the pick-and-pop, take a mismatch into the post, pick up smaller players on switches occasionally and play some center in five-out lineups designed to attempt comebacks against large deficits in the fourth quarter.

Ideally, he’d have been a little more aggressive pulling the trigger on long-range bombs, with just a little over a quarter of his live-ball attempts coming from three-point range, but all in all, it felt like Todd was consistently deployed in the most sensible manner for where he finds himself at this point of his development and how he is expected to contribute over the next few years of his career.

The playing time didn’t feel gifted either. All four of Green, Kuminga, Nix and he were clearly priorities but nothing out of the ordinary for a developmental squad. He averaged 24.4 minutes per game in 15 appearances, which seemed like the right balance between the fact that he made enough shots to keep offering some value on offense but wasn’t efficient enough (53% true shooting[3]) and couldn’t defend well enough to play more than half-the-game for a team that made the playoffs.

The Raleigh, North Carolina native catches on the hop, gets a good deal of elevation for someone his height, fully extends himself for a high release, impresses with his guide hand discipline and seems to have the touch needed to be expected to develop into a good three-point shooter in time – nailing 36.2% of his 47 three-point attempts last season.

The question then becomes what level of shooter he will develop into. For now, Todd needs time and space to load his shot. Given the height of his release point, he was still able to get them off in volume (5.1 three-point shots per 40 minutes) but doesn’t shoot the easiest ball just yet.

He took some jumpers out of the pick-and-pop but is more of a shot taker than a shot maker with the most difficult types of attempts.

When he commanded a hard closeout, Todd showed good dexterity shot-faking into putting the ball on the floor but was only a real threat to score when he got an unimpeded path to the goal.

There were moments when he flashed noteworthy dexterity creating separation for a pull-up in isolation but, generally speaking, he hasn’t yet developed into an explosive leaper off one foot in traffic, a resourceful finisher in a crowd, a threat to score from the in-between area or a shot creator for others on the move (5% assist-rate).

The Team Loaded NC alum is only a slip screener at this point and rarely rolled hard to the basket, even in his minutes as the lone big man in the lineup. When he found himself manning the dunker spot, Todd showed he is not yet an option to play above the rim as a target for lobs, needs to load up to go up and can’t go up with power in a crowd – converting just 58.3% of his 36 attempts at the rim[4].

He also collected just 3.7% of the Ignite’s misses when he was on the floor (365.5 minutes), in large part due to his role, but also highlighting how he doesn’t yet have a knack for mixing it on scrums.

Not yet able to offer much value as a finisher or operating off the bounce, his one way of contributing to the offense, other than spotting up, was taking some mismatches into the post, where he showed to have very little refinement at this point of his development.

Carrying a thin 195-pound frame in the context of his six-foot-10 height, Todd isn’t able to get a deep seal often and hasn’t yet developed much in terms of power moves or a patient approach working his man out of position with fakes, most often only looking to set up an off-balance turnaround fadeaway jumper.

On the other end, the Word of God Christian Academy product mostly acted as a weak-side defender responsible for offering help when Amir Johnson or Brandon Ashley got pulled away into space and closing out to the three-point line.

There were good moments where his timing picking up the roll man forced a kickout but for the most part Todd was consistently a step late and didn’t show to have the quickness off the ground or the superior length to make up for that – averaging just 1.2 blocks and 4.1 personal fouls per 40 minutes. He was also just average helping finish possessions – collecting 17.5% of opponents’ misses when he was on the floor.

Todd was not especially quick in his closeouts but when he did manage to run a more hesitant shooter off his shot, he proved himself capable of staying attached on straight-line drives.

When he was brought to the ball against the pick-and-roll, Todd struggled as much as you’d expect a teenager to do against veterans. He approached the ball in a stance and looked fairly nimble back-pedaling to try keeping the ball in front but rarely successfully stopped dribble penetration via position defense.

Todd seemed more capable switching against the ball-screen. He bends his knees to get down in a stance and though he doesn’t press up, he doesn’t give the ballhandler an extensive cushion either. He moved his feet well enough and proved himself capable of sliding to stay in front of stiffer wings but lacks the strength to play with any sort of physicality and can’t contain dribble penetration through contact.


[1] According to ESPN

[2] DOB: 2001/October/17

[3] According to RealGM

[4] According to NBA.com/stats/

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Joel Ayayi Scouting Report

Joel Ayayi’s third year at Gonzaga was similar to his second year, both in terms of role and statistical profile.

The six-foot-five off-guard was most heavily relied on for defense, as he exchanged duties defending the point of attack with Andrew Nembhard.

Ayayi hasn’t yet developed into an ace defender, as he hasn’t yet developed the size to contain dribble penetration through contact, given his 180-pound frame. He also hasn’t yet shown to have the reaction quickness needed to stay in front of superior talents in terms of speed, as Davion Mitchell blew by him a couple of times in a straight line in the National Championship game.

But he is pretty solid and technically sound making the most average types of scoring threats to work for their shots; bending his knees to get down in a stance, sliding side-to-side fairly well to stay in front of smaller players who aren’t next level in terms of quickness, putting in the effort to go over screens at the point of attack and hustling in pursuit to try contesting from behind.

The Frenchman has shown in the past the competitiveness and the tenacity needed to crossmatch into bigger wings and pick up bigger players on switches but doesn’t figure to be an asset for those strategies in the pros up until he becomes stronger.

I don’t think he should be viewed as just a one-position defender, though.

The 21-year-old[1] is heavily experienced for someone his age, having logged 545 minutes of FIBA experience with the French National Team at the junior level and another 929 minutes with INSEP in the Adidas Next Generation circuit and the French third division, prior to his 2,099 NCAA minutes with Gonzaga over the last three seasons[2].

Having gone through such diverse experiences, he’s shown to be a smart off-ball defender who can be relied on to execute the scheme and make an impact in the hidden areas of the game; switching on the fly to make up for breakdowns against people movement, rotating timely to challenge shots at the rim via verticality and showing good awareness to use the shot clock as a teammate while abandoning his man to help double the post or play goalkeeper against the roll man.

His 2.0 defensive win shares last season ranked second on a team[3] that ranked 11th in the country in adjusted defensive efficiency[4].

That said, other than being a very good guard rebounder (having collected 17.9% of opponents’ misses when he was on the floor these last three seasons at Gonzaga), Ayayi is not an asset to create events in the passing lanes or at the rim, lacking particularly impressive hops or length for someone his height, as he was last measured with a six-foot-six wingspan at the 2016 Eurocamp[5].

On offense, the Bordeaux native logged just 16% usage rate last season, simply relied on to contribute on the margins, as Drew Timme and Jalen Suggs acted as the focal point of the attack, with Corey Kispert as the third element having plays ran for.

On the one hand, Ayayi didn’t have the chance to accumulate volume operating on the ball or to have the versatility of his shooting highlighted in his time at Gonzaga and because of that, he’s not viewed as a priority prospect – currently ranked 62nd on ESPN’s top 100, at the time of writing.

On the other hand, this seems to be the best role for him – against the level of athleticism he saw in the NCAA, Ayayi was not a reliable threat to score or create for others against a set defense.

He can hit walk-in and pull-back three-pointers hiding behind the pick against defenders going under (canning 21 unassisted makes these last two seasons) and has impressed with his patience maneuvering his way around ball-screens via smart uses of circling back for rescreens, slowing the pace to put his man in jail and properly engaging the roll man prior to hitting the roll man.

But the INSEP product is not very fast turning the corner, even while aided by a well-spaced floor. His craft helps him create the movement needed for the team to find an opening against basic strongside hybrid man-zone but if forced to attack two-on-two or against late rotations, Ayayi is not resourceful enough as a scorer or passer to be expected to act as a threat to get to the rim in volume or hit tougher looks if bottled in the in-between area or make crosscourt passes that anticipate those late rotations perfectly.

Nonetheless, he’s proven himself a very smart contributor on the margins, particularly as a cutter who can profit against defenses confused by Gonzaga’s motion. Ayayi is not a threat to play above the rim as a target for lobs but attacks space timely and offers a passing window before the defender recognizes his flashing near the basket, which helped him score repeatedly even as a below the rim finisher.

He took over half of his shots at the rim last season, while assisted on 60% of his 100 makes and another 11 coming via putbacks[6].

Ayayi wasn’t as productive in terms of volume on catch-and-shoot three-pointers, canning just 28 assisted three-point makes in 32 appearances last season, but has proven himself he’s a real threat to score on open spot-ups – nailing a solid 36% of his 225 three-point shots in three years at Gonzaga, a pace of 4.3 such attempts per 40 minutes.

He needs a quick dip for rhythm but catches on the hop and has a compact release, launching from out in front, and rises with good elevation to get his shot off comfortably against average closeouts.

There were glimpses of shooting on the move this past season, mostly in terms of jogging to the ball for a quick dribble-handoff on the side of the floor to execute the old Spurs concept of seeking a teammate to play two-on-two when a play bogs down, but Ayayi can’t be considered a versatile shooter at this point of his development, considering the average speed of his release and the average aggressiveness with which he shoots.


[1] DOB: 2000/March/5

[2] According to RealGM

[3] According to sports-reference

[4] According to Ken Pomeroy

[5] According to Eurospects

[6] According to hoop-math

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Evan Mobley Scouting Report

CONTEXT

Evan Mobley was the third-ranked prospect out of the 2020 high school class.

In the first half of what is certain to be his lone season at Southern California, the seven-foot center has averaged 19.5 points per 40 minutes on 60% effective shooting and compiled a 29.6 PER in 16 appearances, at the time of writing.

He had shown at Rancho Christian the versatility to develop into the sort of scorer who can stress the defense from all over the floor and that has sort of been the case during his brief stay at Southern California, though to a lesser extent than the one that is envisioned for him if he does end up developing into the superstar that he’s widely thought to be on his way to become.

The 19-year-old has gotten a larger chunk of his offense out of the post and roaming around the rim for some finishing opportunities but has been able to show his skill level out of the short roll, take his man in isolation out in space and launch some catch-and-shoot jumpers as well.

But for as skilled and capable with the ball as he is on offense, Mobley might be even more special and a perfect fit for this era on the other end.

His physical profile is underdeveloped for someone his height and it costs some in the more physical areas of the game, but he is supremely quick off the floor and has elevated the level of the defense around him to elite status by making a huge impact as a help defender near the rim.

The hope is for Mobley to be just as impactful away from the basket and offer the sort of versatility that is widely coveted in an era where offenses are stressing defenses to their breaking points because of the proliferation of the one-dribble three-pointer in pick-and-roll, but Southern California has actually mostly deployed him in conventional coverage, which has been somewhat disappointing.

Nonetheless, ESPN currently ranks him second in its top 100.

Check the rest of the post on RealGM

Pierre Sene Scouting Report

CONTEXT

  • Rotation cog on the Senegalese National Team U18 that placed second in the four-team shootout that constituted the 2020 U18 African Championship, played in early December
    • +13 in 109 minutes[1]
  • Wing with prototypical height who primarily spaced the floor on offense and acted as a weakside defender on defense
    • Listed at six-foot-seven[2]
  • Only turns 18 next August[3]
  • Currently developing on Unicaja’s youth system
  • Did not make the cut on ESPN’s way-too-early 2022 mock draft

WEAKSIDE DEFENSE

  • Hustles to closeout with good urgency
    • Good balance on closeouts, manages to force more hesitant shooters off their shots and stays attached off the bounce
  • Stays in a stance away from the ball
    • Executes stunts and recovers with quite pleasing activity
    • Uses his length to clog driving lanes
    • Impressed with his engagement and his hustle covering ground while executing the zone
    • Didn’t stand out in terms of jumping passing lanes: had just two steals in five appearances
  • Active rotating off the weakside in help defense, at times a tad overaggressive helping from the opposite wing
    • Mostly to help crowd the area near the rim but quick enough off his feet to block a shot here and there
    • Flashes of awareness helping against cuts
    • Glimpses of awareness switching on the fly against people movement

INDIVIDUAL DEFENSE

  • Solid isolation defender against similar-sized players
    • Bends his knees to get down in a deep stance
    • Side-to-side quickness to stay attached to opposing wings off the bounce
    • Several lateral slides to stay in front
    • Not yet physical enough to contain dribble penetration through contact due to thin frame for someone his height
    • Guards with his arms up near the rim
  • Got beat out on an island by smaller speedsters
  • Iffy pick-and-roll defender at this point of his development
    • Unable to get skinny over a pick at the point of attack
    • Didn’t stand out in terms of hustle chasing to contest from behind

SHOOTING

  • Catch-and-shoot stroke looks very projectable
    • Catches it on the hop
    • Quick dip for rhythm
    • Rises with great balance
    • Fully extends himself for a high release
    • Overall approach looks quite clean and quick-ish on his best makes
  • Ball doesn’t go in much yet: missed 24 of his 31 three-point shots at the 2020 U18 African Championship
    • Tends to miss short, not to the side

OTHER AREAS OF OFFENSE

  • Flashed some smart cutting on occasion
    • Showed glimpses of quick instincts touch passing against the help
  • Footwork leaves something to be desired but promising balance and dexterity operating off triple threat position
    • Has no idea whatsoever what to do at the rim: missed eight of his 11 two-point shots at the 2020 U18 African Championship
    • Not very adept at going to his left hand at the basket
    • Willing passer on drop-offs: averaged 2.6 assists per 40 minutes in the tournament
  • Didn’t show enough of a handle to operate on the ball, other than a nifty right-to-left crossover in an emergency situation late on the shot clock
    • Averaged 4.8 turnovers per 40 minutes in the event

[1] According to FIBA

[2] According to RealGM

[3] DOB: AUG/12/2003

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Isaac Likekele Scouting Report

CONTEXT

  • 156th-ranked prospect in the 2018 class[1]
  • Listed at six-foot-five, 215 pounds
  • Turns 21 in February[2]
  • Rotation player on the United States National Team U19 that won the title at the 2019 U19 World Cup
    • Played the bulldog defensive specialist role previously filled by guys like Marcus Smart, Elfrid Payton and Josh Okogie
  • Did not take the step forward on offense that was hoped for in his second year at Oklahoma State
    • 13.4 points per 40 minutes on 51.3% true shooting, 21.2% usage rate, and 1.61 assist-to-turnover ratio as a sophomore[3]
  • Doesn’t have much shot creation responsibility now that Cade Cunningham is on the team
    • 13.3% usage rate through his first eight appearances this season
  • Currently projects as an off guard who can bulldoze his way to the rim against a scrambling defense and heat up opposing ballhandlers but who needs to take major steps forward as a shooter in order to be able to set foot on an NBA game any time soon
  • Currently unranked on ESPN’s top 100

ON BALL DEFENSE

  • Bends his knees to get down in a deep stance
  • Very good individual defender
    • Has as many lateral slides as needed to stay in front of similar-sized wings and smaller guards out in space
    • Good deal of side-to-side quickness to stay attached to shifty guards in isolation
    • Plays with active hands to poke the ball and reach around for steals
    • Contests shots within the shooter’s personal space
  • Good pick-and-roll defender
    • Ices ball-screens
    • Puts in the effort to go over the pick but struggles to do so cleanly
    • Hustles in pursuit to contest from behind

OFF BALL DEFENSE

  • Stays in a stance away from the ball
  • Helps crowd the area near the basket
  • Hustle on closeouts leaves something to be desired
    • Rarely seen running the shooter off his shot
  • Good hustle in transition
    • Steps up to the front of the rim as the last line of defense
    • Willing charge drawer
  • Good rebounder for a guard
    • 16% defensive rebounding rate in his two-and-a-half years at Oklahoma State

OFFENSE

  • Rudimentary handle
  • Doesn’t have particularly impressive dexterity with the ball for someone who has been viewed as a point guard prospect in the past
  • Hasn’t shown all that many resources to shake his man side-to-side and get by via craft in isolation
    • Has flashed a low crossover into a quick first step to blow by big men on switches
  • Gets to the rim via maintaining his balance and his momentum forward through contact thanks to the strength in his 215-pound frame
    • Or via weaving into a spin move to gain ground
  • Not explosive enough to go up with power off one foot in traffic
    • Uses his body to create separation near the rim
    • Comfortable going to his left hand in a crowd
  • Good ball mover – trustworthy to make the extra pass around the horn to keep the offense humming
  • Hasn’t quite shown anything particularly impressive as a passer
    • Poor touch and timing on lobs
    • Willing passer on drop-offs
    • Flashed good court vision on hammer passes
  • Can’t shoot
    • Hesitant
    • Catches it on the hop
    • Has a low release out in front
    • Overall approach looks too mechanical
    • Just eight three-point shots in 274 minutes so far this season
  • Good cutter
    • Attacks space off the ball
    • Not a threat to play above the rim as a target for lobs on the regular

[1] According to 247Sports

[2] DOB: FEB/25/2000

[3] According to sports-reference

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Matthew-Alexander Moncrieffe Scouting Report

CONTEXT

  • 158th-ranked prospect in the 2020 high school class[1]
  • Listed at six-foot-seven, 215 pounds
    • Seven-foot wingspan, eight-foot-eight standing reach[2]
  • Turns 20 in March[3]
  • Rotation player on the Canadian National Team U17 that placed fourth at the 2018 U17 World Cup and lower-end minutes eater on the Canadian National Team U19 that finished eighth at the 2019 U19 World Cup
    • Named to the 2019 Nike Hoop Summit
  • Viewed as more of a combo forward prospect with the Canadian National Team, Orangeville Prep and CIA Bounce in the junior ranks but has spent the vast majority of his minutes through his first couple of months at Oklahoma State as the backup center
  • Good athletic talent but hasn’t yet developed into a real athlete
  • 16.8 PER and +5.1 Net Rating in 159 minutes so far this season[4]
  • Currently not ranked on ESPN’s top 100

HELP DEFENSE

  • Good combination of commitment and activity coming off the weakside to contest shots at the rim
  • Glimpses of high leaping ability but currently more capable of challenging shots via verticality rather than as a regular threat to block shots in volume
    • Has blocked just one shot in 160 minutes, at the time of writing
    • Has averaged 20 minutes per game for a team that has allowed just 53.3% shooting at the rim – a top 70 mark in Division I[5]
  • Hasn’t yet developed the timing to step up to the front of the rim as the last line of defender much, let alone make preventive rotations that deny the opponent space towards driving all the way to the rim, but contests from the side actively on middle drives
  • Shadows post-ups hunting for opportunities to challenge over his teammate at the last second but hasn’t yet shown enough explosiveness to be able to make plays on the ball in these instances
  • Prone to biting on shot fakes from time-to-time but doesn’t put himself into too much danger, having averaged just 3.8 personal fouls per 40 minutes
  • Flashes of high-level awareness switching on the fly to make up for breakdowns against people movement

PICK-AND-ROLL DEFENSE

  • Has most often gone up to the foul line and dropped back
    • Glimpses of being able to stop the ball with fluid lateral slides to prevent the ballhandler from turning the corner right away off the pick
    • Hasn’t yet developed quick-twitching reactions to leverage his length into contesting mid-range pull-ups effectively
    • Hasn’t yet developed a knack for using his rumored seven-foot wingspan into shutting down passing lanes – has just four steals in eight appearances so far this season
  • Has picked up smaller players on switches on occasion
    • Bends his knees some but gets down into more of a soft stance
    • Doesn’t seem comfortable pressing the ballhandler, preferring to leave a cushion
    • Doesn’t tend to contest the pull-up shot into the opponent’s personal space
    • Working with that cushion, can stay attached to smaller players on a straight line
    • Doesn’t leverage his 215-pound frame into containing dribble penetration through contact
  • Hasn’t yet been deployed in a way that shows if he has the nimbleness needed to blitz high on the perimeter and contest three-pointers

REBOUNDING

  • Often attentive to his boxout responsibilities but not particularly tough or physical shielding opponents out of his rebounding area
    • Has collected just 8.7% of opponents’ misses when he’s been on the floor this season
  • Active and productive generating second chance opportunities
    • Regular putback dunk threat
    • Quick second jump: almost one fifth of his baskets at the rim have been putback scores
    • Has collected 13.9% of Oklahoma State’s misses when he’s been on the floor

OFFENSE

  • Promising screener
    • Widens his stance to enhance his screening area
    • Smart use of circling back to re-screen
    • Moving screens off-ball
  • Can play above the rim as a target for lobs sneaking behind the defense but not often seen rolling hard down the lane
    • Hasn’t yet developed the explosiveness to go up with power through contact
    • Struggled catching the ball on the move at times
  • Touch around the basket leaves something to be desired
    • Has shot just 57.4% on 47 attempts at the rim[6]
    • Has shot just 51.3% on 39 non-dunk attempts at the rim[7]
    • Hasn’t shown much comfort going to his left hand in a crowd
    • Hasn’t yet developed enough strength to finish through contact regularly
  • Not much of a threat as a post scorer
    • Can’t set deep position or a clean seal yet
    • Flashes of a quick spin around the defender
    • Seems more comfortable turning and facing from the mid-post but struggles some to maintain his balance through contact and hasn’t yet shown good enough touch for no-dribble jumpers
    • Not a threat to score away from the immediate basket area, having missed nine of his 10 such shots so far
    • Has struggled with his feel against hard double teams and opponents crowding him
  • Facing the basket
    • Good dexterity with the ball driving from the perimeter
    • Flashes of appealing smoothness on a straight-line
    • Court vision is underdeveloped – prone to driving to a crowd and charging into the defender’s chest
    • Took three-pointers on occasion in the junior ranks but hasn’t yet at Oklahoma State and has missed 16 of his 26 free throws
  • Not quite a huge asset to create for others at this point of his development but has promising moments acting as a hub to facilitate offense via dribble-handoffs, posting up to pass out, and post-to-post passing
    • Has assisted on 8.61% of Oklahoma State’s scores when he’s been on the floor, with a 0.88 assist-to-turnover ratio

[1] According to 247Sports

[2] According to The Stepien

[3] DOB: MAR/22/2001

[4] According to RealGM

[5] According to hoop-math

[6] According to hoop-math

[7] According to barttorvik

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Cade Cunningham Scouting Report

CONTEXT

A cult hero among draftniks for about three years now, Cade Cunningham has been as good as expected in his first eight appearances in college.

He ended up the second-ranked recruit in the 2020 high school class because Jalen Green had a killer senior year at Prolific Prep but remains widely considered the crown jewel of a highly rated 2021 draft class, currently ranked first on ESPN’s top 100.

Given the prolificacy of his passing at Montverde Academy, the Texas Titans and the United States National Team U19, where he established himself as the sort of genius who can anticipate passing lanes a split-second before they come open, his 22.5% assist rate in his 266 minutes at Oklahoma State might stand out as a tad disappointing, but it says more about the quality of shooting around him than any potential misevaluation regarding the quality of his court vision.

As is the case, the six-foot-eight lead ballhandler has stood out more as a scorer. He has averaged 23.3 points per 40 minutes on 55.6% true shooting, while logging 29.4% usage.

With Isaac Likekele, whose calling card is as a bulldog on-ball defender, by his side, Cunningham hasn’t been relied on to check opposing ballhandlers as regularly as he did with Montverde Academy, where he proved himself capable of holding his own defending the point of attack, despite his size.

Primarily an off-ball defender so far at Oklahoma State, the 19-year-old hasn’t looked particularly special in terms of flying around to create events but has, however, really impressed with his impact in the hidden areas of the game.

Check the rest of the post on RealGM

Jalen Smith Scouting Report

(First posted on RealGM)

Smith is the premiere 3&D center in this class.

As a sophomore, the Baltimore native played center throughout and averaged 31.3 minutes per game for a team that ranked 30th in the country in lowest percentage of shots allowed at the rim and 71st in block percentage at the rim, which boosted them to finish 22nd in adjusted defensive efficiency.

He is attentive and active stepping up to the front of the rim as the last line of defense, a quick leaper off two feet and leverages his nine-foot-two standing reach to block and alter shots in volume. His 8.3% block rate is the sixth-best mark on ESPN’s top 100.

It’s not as clear how quick he is coming across the lane on longer rotations but sticking near the goal, Smith exceled as a rim protector.

In pick-and-roll, the 20-year-old usually went up to the foul line and dropped back. He often approached the ballhandler flat-footed and didn’t slide laterally to stop the ball as quickly as he was expected but showed fluid footwork backpedalling to keep pace with smaller players foul line down and proved himself capable of blocking a shot defending on the ball.

Smith really impressed with some multiple effort plays where he was able to stop the ball, force the pocket pass and then turnaround to contest the roll man at the basket effectively, besides showing glimpses of good quickness contesting shots at the three-point line in the pick-and-pop.

On offense, the six-foot-nine stretch big impresses the most as a three-point shooter.

He didn’t space out to the three-point line as much as he’ll likely be asked to do in the pros, taking just 27.9% of his field goal attempts from beyond the arc in his final year at Maryland.

Most of his long-range bombs were taken out of the pick-and-pop and Smith really stood out with the fluidity of his release and his footwork in these instances.

He nailed 36.8% of his 87 three-point shots last season, at a pace of 3.6 such attempts per 40 minutes.

Near the goal, Smith can play above the rim as a target for lobs out of the dunker spot and on longer rolls, though it’s unclear if he’s explosive enough to go up with power diving down the lane in traffic.

His total of 49 dunks in the sixth-best mark among those on ESPN’s top 100 who played in the NCAA last season and his touch on non-dunk finishes impressed too, as he shot 61.3% on 106 layup attempts.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Precious Achiuwa Scouting Report

(First posted on RealGM)

Achiuwa was the biggest beneficiary of Wiseman’s decision to leave Memphis after just three appearances.

With the six-foot-11 center gone, he got to play closer to the rim on both ends and compiled strong numbers as a finisher, rebounder and shot blocker.

A closer look reveals a prospect who is underdeveloped in terms of skill and technique, though.

The six-foot-seven big man has shown to be attentive to his responsibilities stepping up to the front of the rim as the last line of defense, as well as an easy leaper off two feet and adept at leveraging his nine-foot standing reach to challenge shots above the rim.

Perhaps more impressively, he also flashed some promising recognition skills helping against backdoor cuts and making preventive rotations that denied the ball-handler space towards driving all the way to the rim.

He’s also shown to be active rotating off the weakside to pick up the roll man and a quick enough leaper to make plays on the ball off quick sprints to the basket – averaging 2.5 blocks per 40 minutes last season.

Achiuwa is not yet as effective a rim protector as he could be because it’s not uncommon to see him trying to meet the ball-handler at the summit with odd angles. He has a habit of not turning his body towards the opponent completely, thus unable to position himself perfectly between the opponent and the goal.

He is also prone to biting on shot fakes, although he managed to stay out of foul trouble in his one year at Memphis – averaging 3.1 personal fouls per 40 minutes.

In pick-and-roll, Achiuwa was most commonly asked to show-and-recover while extending a couple of steps above the foul line. He was regularly seen approaching the ball handler flat-footed, didn’t stand out in terms of being able to stop the ball while keeping track of the roll man behind him and had some iffy moments where he got completely turned around out in space.

In more basic north-and-south actions, Achiuwa puts in the effort to contest pull-ups and his nine-foot standing reach is an asset in mid-range. He also impressed with his hustle defending the pick-and-pop, able to cover some ground in a pinch and contest the catch-and-shoot attempt effectively.

Given the fact he was more of a perimeter player in his one year at Montverde Academy, there is hope he could pick up smaller players on switches regularly but his time at Memphis was discouraging.

He didn’t hold up as well in college as he had in high school, exchanging into the ballhandler flat-footed and then getting into a soft stance, too spacey to be effective. He has a few lateral slides in him to stay attached to less threatening types who can only go north-and-south without much speed but without locking in, Achiuwa can’t be trusted to switch onto a shiftier type who can shake him side-to-side. He was also not a good option to crossmatch onto perimeter players regularly, even other wing-sized players, due to his inability to get over a screen.

On offense, the Port Harcourt, Nigeria native acted primarily as a threat to finish near the goal at Memphis.

His hands catching the ball on the move proved to be only so-so but Achiuwa proved capable of going up explosively off two feet without needing to load up and play above the rim as a target for lobs, not just sneaking behind the defense on longer rolls and out of the dunker spot but diving down the middle of the lane in a crowd too.

With Lance Thomas and Isaiah Maurice spacing the floor, he was able to live near the basket once Wiseman departed – taking 62.6% of his live-ball attempts within close range and being assisted or finishing putbacks on 79% of his makes there.

Achiuwa showed glimpses of versatility to his finishing package at the basket with reverses, using his length to over-extend, going to his left hand reasonably comfortably and being able to finish through contact. But his touch on non-dunk finishes left a lot to be desired.

His 148 makes at the rim rank fifth among NCAA prospects listed on ESPN’s top 100 and his 64.1% shooting on 231 total attempts at the basket looks solid on the surface but subtracting his 47-for-52 shooting on dunks results in Achiuwa shooting just 56.4% on 179 layups.

Achiuwa has shown a two-dribble stop-and-pop pull-up off immediately attacking the pass when he spaced out to the three-point line and it looks sweet if he’s allowed to go into this pre-arranged choreography unbothered but other than that, Achiuwa struggled badly away from the immediate basket area – missing 75.4% of his 138 shots away from the rim.

He spaced out to the three-point line from time-to-time but far less than he showed the ambition to do in his time at Montverde, averaging just 1.7 three-point shots per 40 minutes in his one year at Memphis.

Achiuwa hit just 32.5% of his 40 three-point shots this past season, as well as just 59.9% of his 187 foul shots, putting into question if he even has the touch in place for a projectable jump-shooting stroke to be built upon.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara

Obadiah Toppin Scouting Report

(First posted on RealGM)

This a draft filled with unexpected rises to prominence but Toppin’s is probably the most incredible.

247Sports ranked 558 players graduating out of high school in the 2017 and Toppin was not one of them. Three years later, he is likely to end up a lottery pick after two years at Dayton.

This past season, the six-foot-nine finisher was arguably the most prolific scorer in college basketball – averaging 25.3 points per 40 minutes on 68.4% true shooting and 28% usage, leading Dayton to 29 wins in 31 games, and winning Wooden Award and Naismith College Player of the Year honors as a result.

Toppin exceled as a threat to score around the basket – converting 82.8% of his 203 shots at the rim, with two thirds of his makes assisted.

Though he is mostly an up-and-down leaper who didn’t often show particularly impressive flexibility hanging and adjusting his body in the air or a diverse arsenal of finishes around rim protectors, the 22-year-old can score with either hand around the goal on non-dunk finishes and finish through contact – converting 69.3% of his 88 layups.

He is a good screener who looks to draw contact and disrupt the on-ball defender and even flashed some savviness setting some moving picks. On the roll, Toppin can play above the rim as a target for lobs sneaking behind the defense on longer rolls and even flashed some noteworthy explosiveness rising in a crowd down the lane without needing to load up to go up with power. His total of 107 dunks is the best-mark on ESPN’s top 100.

What sets him apart from other play-finishers is that Toppin is a threat from beyond the arc as well. He nailed 39% of his 82 three-point shots this past season, though at a pace of just 3.3 such attempts per 40 minutes. He finishes his collegiate career nailing 41% of his 103 three-point shots over his two years in the NCAA, though at a pace of just 2.2 such attempts per 40 minutes.

Besides basic spot-ups, Toppin has proven himself able to take long-range bombs off the pick-and-pop and relocating off an offensive rebound too.

He was good post scorer in college but a large chunk of it was based on his ability to overwhelm younger, less physically developed, outmatched competition. It seems unlikely to translate to the pros.

But the biggest concerns regarding his translation to the NBA surround his defense.

When Dayton asked him to venture far beyond the foul line and show hard at the three-point line, Toppin was at times lackadaisical in his approach to the ballhandler and would even overplay the level of the screen, giving up the side of the rejection of the pick completely and rarely being able to get back into the play once the ballhandler got downhill.

In more conservative drop-back coverage, going up no more than a step beyond the foul line, he didn’t prove capable of making a substantial contribution either. Toppin rarely contested pull-up jumpers effectively and, though he was able to keep pace with ball handlers on a straight-line foul line down, he was not much of a threat to block shots defending on the ball.

But perhaps more troubling for his pro prospects, Toppin didn’t prove himself quick enough to guard both the ballhandler and keep the roll man from getting behind him or to shut down pocket passes and bat away lobs, which limits his team’s ability to defend the pick-and-roll two-on-two, which is what the NBA is looking for these days. Especially considering he didn’t show enough footspeed to stop the ball and hustle to contest stretch big men in the pick-and-pop either.

If you can’t guard the pick-and-roll two-on-two and limit help as much as you can, what NBA teams prefer to do then is switch and Toppin also doesn’t figure to be an asset for that strategy either.

As a help defender, he can rotate and block a shot from time-to-time but has shown only so-so proactivity and quickness coming across the lane in help defense on longer rotations. Keeping a hunched posture off ball, he looked to have heavier feet moving off the ball than I remember seeing from him as a freshman or even that you usually see from him on offense.

Toppin didn’t make much of an impact in the hidden areas of the game either, as you don’t often see him shadowing isolations to intervene at the last second when a teammate gets beat or making preventive rotations that cut off a driver’s path to the basket. He is actually quite detrimental in one of the hidden areas, as he’s often blown by on closeouts and exposes the defense behind him.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Rafael Uehara is the managing editor of ‘Basketball Scouting’. More of his work can be found here or at RealGM, where he is a regular contributor. He can be followed on twitter as @rafael_uehara